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caonacl
05-29-2009, 06:46 PM
Obama: Residents must prepare for hurricanes
By EILEEN SULLIVAN –
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama urged residents of hurricane-prone communities on Friday to take responsibility for their own safety and start planning now.

Hurricane season officially begins Monday.

"A lot of these plans are not complicated," the president said after a disaster-preparedness briefing at the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Individuals should be ready with a supply of nonperishable food, water, first aid kits and radios that will work in the rain, he said.

The president said state governments have the primary responsibility for preparing and responding to disasters. He said all the resources of the federal government are there to back them up.

"We are determined to be as prepared as possible when the next catastrophic hurricane hits the United States," Obama said.

During his presidential campaign, Obama criticized the Bush administration's late response and poor preparation for Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

The points Obama drilled home Friday were similar to those raised after Katrina.

While FEMA and the federal government has made many changes since 2005 to improve its preparations and response, government investigators said there are still some holes in the agency's plans.

A report issued Friday by the Government Accountability Office says FEMA does not have a plan to coordinate all the national disaster exercises and cannot track whether other federal agencies and communities across the country are prepared to respond to disasters.

In its response to the report, FEMA said it relies on cooperation from other agencies to complete some of its plans.

In a separate briefing at the White House, the director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Louis Uccellini, echoed Obama's message to people living in hurricane-prone parts of the country.
"They can't wait until a storm is approaching the coast," Uccellini said. "They have to make their plans now."

Forecasters are predicting a normal hurricane season, with four to seven hurricanes of which one to three are likely to be major storms. The first tropical depression of the season is currently in the Atlantic, heading north. It's not expected to hit the United States.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gEt5uWVUO6Y-31QdkOgwzGgGiImAD98G5GB81

caonacl
05-29-2009, 06:50 PM
21 Hurricanes for 2009 Season (http://thisbluemarble.com/all-news/59-other-news/235-21-hurricanes-for-2009-season) [/URL] (http://thisbluemarble.com/all-news/59-other-news/235-21-hurricanes-for-2009-season?tmpl=component&print=1&layout=default&page=)
Friday, 29 May 2009 16:28

Monday, June 1, marks the start of the 2009 Hurricane Season. Projections, from two reputable sources of seasonal tropical cyclone forecasting, point to near average activity. The team of Professor Bill Gray and Dr. Philip Klotzbach of Colorado State University is projecting an average season as compared to the period 1950-2000 activity of ten Named Storms, six Hurricanes and two Intense Hurricanes. Their projections are for twelve Named Storms, of which six are projected to become hurricanes and of that six, two to be Major or Intense (Category 3, 4 or 5).


The National Oceanic Atmospheric Association (NOAA) of the United States is indicating in their seasonal forecasts, a 50 percent probability that it will be an average season. Their projections state that there is a 70 percent chance of having nine to fourteen Named Storms, of which four to seven could become Hurricanes and of those one to three Major or Intense Hurricanes.

One condition contributing to the prediction of an average season is the development of neutral to el Niño condition. The current la Niña conditions are projected to become neutral or transition to warmer Eastern Pacific Ocean temperatures (el Niño) by September. El Niño conditions tend to decrease levels of Atlantic hurricane activity.

Another factor contributing to the forecast of an average season is the cooler than average ocean temperatures in the eastern Atlantic. Tropical cyclones use the warm ocean waters as the source of their energy. Such anomalously cool temperatures are far less conducive to an active season.

A major competing factor supporting more activity than normal this year is the conditions related to the ongoing high-activity era that began in the mid nineties. It has been noted that the Atlantic basin is in a 20 to 30 year cycle of active seasons.

There are inherent difficulties associated with predicting tropical cyclone activity over a six month period as errors within the forecast process increase considerably with time. In addition, these forecasts do not specifically predict where these cyclones will make landfall within the Atlantic Basin and the Caribbean. Landfall is dictated to a great extent by the weather patterns in place over and around the area at the time the storm approaches. Such patterns are near impossible to predict with any appreciable degree of accuracy over an extended time period such as four to six months. Besides, even in a below average season, it only takes one system to create enough havoc to cause the loss of life and set back our economy some five, ten or even fifteen years. More so, this lone system does not even have to be very intense as evidenced by Tropical Storm Arthur and the remnants of Tropical Depression #16 last season.
The properly functioning Belize Doppler radar will be able to provide accurate tracking of any tropical cyclone that enters or develops within a 400 km (240 miles) radius of Belize. This will greatly assist the National Meteorological Service in providing more accurate and timely updates on the location of such systems that pose a threat to the nation.
In the 2009 Hurricane Season, like any other in the past, the need to prepare for a strike is essential. It could only take one storm visiting our shores to make it a bad season for Belize. Memories of last year’s two major flooding events should still be vividly etched in our minds. Be prepared!
2009 Hurricane Names:
1) Ana
2) Bill
3) Claudette
4) Danny
5) Erika
6) Fred
7) Grace
8) Henri
9) Ida
10) Joaquin
11) Kate
12) Larry
13) Mindy
14) Nicolas
15) Odette
16) Peter
17) Rose
18) Sam
19) Teresa
20) Victor
21) Wanda
[URL]http://www.guardian.bz/all-news/59-other-news/235-21-hurricanes-for-2009-season (http://javascript<b></b>:void(null))

caonacl
05-29-2009, 08:04 PM
Obama: Residents must prepare for hurricanes

"We are determined to be as prepared as possible when the next catastrophic hurricane hits the United States," Obama said.

....In a separate briefing at the White House, the director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Louis Uccellini, echoed Obama's message to people living in hurricane-prone parts of the country.
"They can't wait until a storm is approaching the coast," Uccellini said. "They have to make their plans now."

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5gEt5uWVUO6Y-31QdkOgwzGgGiImAD98G5GB81
http://thisbluemarble.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=1389&stc=1&d=1243641872

Potemkin
06-01-2009, 08:35 AM
President Barack Obama urged residents of hurricane-prone communities on Friday to take responsibility for their own safety and start planning now.

Good luck with that.