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caonacl
06-02-2009, 07:57 PM
http://icons-pe.wunderground.com/data/images/at200992_model.gif

http://www.wunderground.com/tropical/tracking/at200992_model.html
The early models had this TS hitting the UK, but it has moved further South throughout the day.

Ought Six
06-02-2009, 09:47 PM
It is not "Katrina". It is not a hurricane. It is not a tropical storm. It is not even a tropical deperession. It is a freakin' low pressure area. :ohmygod:

caonacl
06-02-2009, 09:54 PM
It's was one of the biggest things in the Atlantic this year.

[/URL].

[URL="http://thisbluemarble.com/tropical/tracking/at200992_model.html"]http://resize-pe.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/resize?filename=/data/images/at200992_model.gif&width=140&height=105 (http://thisbluemarble.com/tropical/tracking/at200992_model.html)

Invest 92 (http://thisbluemarble.com/tropical/tracking/at200992_model.html)
Wind: 50 MPH — Location: 44.7 24.7W — Movement: NW
This area of disturbed weather has the potential for tropical development.
(http://thisbluemarble.com/tropical/tracking/at200992_model.html)

Ought Six
06-02-2009, 10:05 PM
Considering that the north Atlantic storm season starts on the 1st of June, that is an utterly meaningless statement. It is the biggest because it is the first and only storm of the season thus far. (duh!) 50 mph winds are the norm in a regular low pressure system out in the Atlantic. This is not unusual in any way. It *may* turn into a significant storm, but right now it is nothing. To call it "Katrina" is idiotic.

Your constant extreme exaggerations of the slightest perceived threat have become extremely tiresome. :mkay:

caonacl
06-02-2009, 10:13 PM
Not Really
YouTube - Disasters - Thames flood risk to London - part 2 - BBC

Ought Six
06-03-2009, 02:28 AM
.... thus once again proving my point.

Ought Six
06-06-2009, 08:26 PM
So how is that 'Katrina' doing, c? I Googled the news for storms in Spain. *Nothing*. The link to Invest 92 is now dead, which means it petered out. That prediction kinda crashed and burned, no? :mkay:

But I see that you have already moved on to your next ridiculous weather disaster fantasy (http://thisbluemarble.com/showthread.php?t=13984). So I guess the technique is obvious. You keep spamming the board with predictions of doom for every proto-storm announcement you can dredge up on the net. This will go on until finally one storm turns out to be in any way serious. Then, you jump up, shouting "SEE! I WAS RIGHT ALL ALONG !!!"
:ll:

caonacl
10-05-2009, 08:55 PM
So how is that 'Katrina' doing, c? I Googled the news for storms in Spain. *Nothing*. The link to Invest 92 is now dead, which means it petered out. That prediction kinda crashed and burned, no? :mkay:

But I see that you have already moved on to your next ridiculous weather disaster fantasy (http://thisbluemarble.com/showthread.php?t=13984). So I guess the technique is obvious. You keep spamming the board with predictions of doom for every proto-storm announcement you can dredge up on the net. This will go on until finally one storm turns out to be in any way serious. Then, you jump up, shouting "SEE! I WAS RIGHT ALL ALONG !!!"
:ll:
I told ya so!
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/overview_atl/atl_overview.gif

Sysiphus
10-05-2009, 09:40 PM
cao - they have Atlantic wintertime lows that hit N. England/Scotland with easily 80 kt winds and torrential rains every December and January. A TS with 45kts and a few inches of rain would be a picnic for them by comparison. The biggest downside (IIRC from living in London for nearly 3 years) is that heavy rain in October means wet leaves on the train tracks, which is an absolute mess for the timetables - seriously, I am not kidding.

caonacl
10-05-2009, 09:58 PM
Maybe this will contribute to more tropical activity for the EU


News Release : Surprising Return of North Atlantic Circulation Pump
Sea Ice Decline May Actually Have Aided Ocean Overturning

January 5, 2009
Media Relations Office
93 Water Street MS #16
Woods Hole Oceanographic InstitutionJanuary 5, 2009

One of the “pumps” contributing to the ocean’s global circulation suddenly switched on again last winter for the first time this decade, scientists reported Tuesday (Dec. 23) in Nature Geoscience. The finding surprised scientists, who had been wondering if global warming was inhibiting the pump—which, in turn, would cause other far-reaching climate changes.

The “pump” in question is the sinking of cold, dense water in the North Atlantic Ocean in the winter. It drives water down into the lower limb of what is often described as the Great Ocean Conveyor. To replace that down-flowing water, warm surface waters from the tropics are pulled northward along the Conveyor’s upper limb.

The phenomenon helps draw down the man-made buildup of carbon dioxide from air to surface waters and eventually into the depths, where the greenhouse gas can be stored for centuries and offset global warming. It also transports warm tropical waters northward, where the ocean transfers heat to the air and keeps winter climate in the North Atlantic region much warmer than it would be otherwise.

A research team led by Kjetil Våge and Robert Pickart of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution examined new data collected by robotic floats that have been drifting for several years in the Labrador and Irminger Seas around southern Greenland. These Argo floats—part of a fleet of 3,000 dispatched since 2000 through the world’s oceans—descend to depths of 1.25 miles (2,000 meters), collect temperature and salinity data as they periodically rise toward the surface, and then transmit the data via satellite before descending again.

Unlike ships that usually (and wisely) avoid rough North Atlantic seas in winter, the Argo floats provide a way to measure the sinking of cold waters in the season that it occurs. The pump is driven by the contrast between frigid, dry winter air and warm water, which draws heat from the ocean into the atmosphere. That leaves the water denser, and it consequently sinks.

As air temperatures have generally warmed over the last two decades, the sinking of cold water in these northern seas has been either shallow or absent. But the new Argo float data showed that in the winter of 2007-2008, cold water sank significantly beyond .62 miles (1,000 meters) deep in northern seas for the first time in eight years and for only the second time since the mid-1990s. Beyond that depth, waters can be swept into lower limb of the Conveyor and carried around the world.

“The obvious question is, why?” wrote Våge, Pickart, and colleagues. Investigating that question, the researchers turned up a myriad of interrelated factors that may have caused Labrador and Irminger Seas water to resume sinking. The complexity of the process makes it difficult to predict future changes in ocean circulation and climate, concluded the research team, which included Virginie Thierry (Laboratoire de Physique des Océans), Gilles Reverdin (Laboratoire d'Océanographie Dynamique et de Climatologie), Craig M. Lee (University of Washington), Brian Petrie (Bedford Institute of Oceanography), Tom A. Agnew and Amy Wong (Meteorological Service of Canada), and Mads H. Ribergaard (Danish Meteorological Institute).

Sinking was undoubtedly enhanced last winter by air temperatures over the North Atlantic that were 9° to 11°F (5° to 6°C) colder than in the previous seven years. That often occurs when a seesawing pattern of high- and low- pressure air masses, called the North Atlantic Oscillation, is in its “positive” position, bringing frigid westerly winds from Canada streaking across the North Atlantic. But, curiously, that was also the case in 2006-2007, in which sinking did not occur.

The lack of substantial sinking throughout the decade meant that there was no “preconditioning”—that is, colder waters could not build up from previous winters to a point where they are easily pushed over a density threshold and sink the following year, the research team said. That made the sudden reappearance of sinking in 2007-2008 all the more surprising.

Digging deeper, the researchers found that local wind patterns, which occurred in 2007-2008 (but not the preceding winter), may have played a role. In particular, storms tended to track farther to the south, pulling cold air off the ice edge of eastern Canada into the Labrador Sea. The same storms also passed Cape Farewell at the southern tip of Greenland, creating a phenomenon known as Greenland tip jets: High winds from the west deflect around the glacial slopes of Greenland, accelerating as they draw cold, ocean-chilling air into a relatively small area over the southern Irminger Sea.

A final clue emerged. Analyzing satellite and in-situ ocean data, the researchers said a large amount pack ice and fresh water was exported into the northwest Labrador Sea in the summer of 2007. This froze the following winter, significantly extending the ice edge farther offshore. As a consequence, cold air from the North American continent traveled farther over ice, instead of warmer ocean waters, remaining cold until it hit warmer open water in the middle of Labrador Sea. The resulting temperature contrast helped trigger the sinking process.

The scientists noted “that the increased liquid and frozen freshwater flux into the Labrador Sea was probably tied to the large export of sea ice from the Arctic Ocean that contributed to the record minimum in sea-ice extent observed in the summer of 2007. Ironically, this disappearance of Arctic sea ice, which has been linked to global warming, may have helped trigger the return of deep wintertime [water sinking] to the North Atlantic.”

http://www.whoi.edu/page.do?pid=7545&tid=282&cid=54366&ct=162

BirdGuano
10-05-2009, 10:40 PM
Or maybe not.

:rofl:

caonacl
11-20-2009, 10:04 PM
Or maybe not.

:rofl:
You were warned!

November 21, 2009


'Rain like this happens once every 1,000 years'





Steve Bird and Lindsay McIntosh




div#related-article-links p a, div#related-article-links p a:visited {color:#06c;} The full and devastating impact of England’s worst recorded day of rain was still emerging last night as tributes were paid to a policeman swept away by floodwaters while trying to save others.

PC Bill Barker was helping motorists stranded on a bridge over the Derwent in the Cumbrian town of Workington when it collapsed. His body was discovered hours later on a nearby beach.

The Environment Agency said that the flooding across the region was so severe that such an event was likely to happen only once in 1,000 years. The rainfall, on to an already saturated terrain, was the highest level measured in England since records began. Meteorologists recorded 314mm (12in) of rain in 24 hours and flood warnings remained in place across the North West of England, parts of Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.
The bridge from which PC Barker fell to his death was one of at least four to be washed away. Cumbria County Council issued a warning to motorists and pedestrians to avoid using such crossings as they could be extremely dangerous. Hundreds of homes and businesses were evacuated, many of them ruined by floodwater and mud.



Jerry Graham, Cumbria’s Assistant Chief Constable, said that PC Barker and a colleague had gone on to the bridge to help drivers who were trying to cross it. He said: “It was obvious they were going to put themselves in danger so PC Barker went to try and protect them. The bridge gave way just due to the volume of water and PC Barker went into the water.”

The floods will cost millions. An Association of British Insurers spokesman said: “While it is far too early \ a precise figure, early estimates are that there will be between 500 and 1,000 claims, domestic and business. This will mean payouts of between £50 million and £100 million.”

Emergency services continued to rescue those still trapped yesterday. They urged anyone who had gone to see the destruction for themselves to leave because their vehicles were blocking roads and hampering efforts to reach the worst-hit areas. In Cockermouth, the town worst hit by the flooding, people were winched from the waters. The two rivers that run through the town burst their banks, blocking roads and forcing the rescue of more than 200 people.

The Federation of Small Businesses opened its £500,000 Disaster Recovery Fund for its members in Scotland and the North West of England.
It appeared that the worst may be over early this morning as flood levels dropped by about 2in an hour. Police estimated that 1,100 homes across the county were affected by flooding.
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article6926363.ece

caonacl
11-20-2009, 10:09 PM
Flooding of Biblical proportion in England causing devastation

November 20, 7:13 PMhttp://image.examiner.com/img/greydot.gifWorld News Examiner (http://thisbluemarble.com/x-28320-World-News-Examiner)http://image.examiner.com/img/greydot.gifRebecca Kelley


http://image3.examiner.com/images/blog/EXID28320/images/Floods_3.jpghttp://image3.examiner.com/images/blog/EXID28320/images/Floods_1.jpghttp://image3.examiner.com/images/blog/EXID28320/images/Floods_2.jpg

Left - Royal National Lifeboat Institution rescuing residents in Cockermouth, England.
Middle - A row of houses are seen engulfed by floodwaters after a heavy rain caused localized flooding in Cockermouth, Cumbria, England, Friday, Nov 20,2009..
Right - Resisdents of Cockermouth are rescued from their homes by dingy's after the heavy downfall of rain.
(AP Photos/Scott Heppell)
Cockermouth, England – Houses localized in Cockermouth, Cumbria, England were engulfed by floodwaters after a day of unprecentended rain today.

Police report that at least 960 homes are flooded. Residents are being rescued from their homes by members of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution. They reported having to rescue around 200 people stranded by the rising floodwater in the northern England tourist town.

Police reported helicopters winching people to safety as more than 200 people were forced to leave their homes overnight, as bridges collapsed into raging rivers and main roads were blocked.


Local House of Commons lawmaker Tony Cunningham told The Associated Press, the flood was "of biblical proportions," adding that "the scale and the force of the devastation in Cockermouth is huge."

A British police officer was swept to his death today as the 44-year-old officer as a bridge collapsed under pressure from surging waters amid frantic attempts to rescue people from stricken towns and villages.

Britain has been hit by severe flooding in recent years, raising questions about the impact of global warming.

Last year the country saw its wettest summer since records began in 1914. Floods in 2007 affected 55,000 homes and businesses and left an insurance bill of around $5 billion.

http://www.examiner.com/x-28320-World-News-Examiner~y2009m11d20-Flooding-of-Biblical-proportion-in-England-causing-devastation

caonacl
11-21-2009, 04:51 PM
Brown visits British flood victims

By Europe Correspondent Emma Alberici

http://www.abc.net.au/reslib/200911/r473677_2380648.jpg (http://www.abc.net.au/reslib/200911/r473677_2380653.jpg)
Mr Brown met relief workers and residents who had been evacuated from their homes. (Reuters: Phil Noble)



The In what has been described as a one in a thousand year event, heavy rains in Britain have destroyed four bridges and flooded 1,000 homes and businesses.

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown has visited flood victims and relief workers in Cumbria. He has pledged another $1.8 million of taxpayers money to help the region.

He thanked and praised all those involved in the rescue effort.
There are 23 flood warnings in force across northern England, Scotland and Wales.

The unprecedented deluge, destroyed flood defences in northern England that had been built only four years ago.

As the scale of the disaster became apparent, the Army was brought in to help save those who remained trapped in their homes.

Emergency services are advising locals not to return to their houses yet, as forecasters predict fresh downpours after England's wettest day on record caused widespread chaos, sweeping away bridges and claiming the life of a policeman.

Constable Bill Barker died on the eve of his 45th birthday when a bridge collapsed underneath him as he directed motorists away from the crumbling structure on the River Derwent.

Constable Barker was a father of four.

During the visit, British Prime Minister Gordon Brown praised the rescue efforts and paid tribute to Constable Barker.

In a message to local officials, the Queen said she was "deeply concerned and saddened" by the floods.
http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2009/11/22/2749752.htm?section=world

Ought Six
11-21-2009, 04:57 PM
Wow! Some flooding in England. That is a real 'Katrina', like the one that laid waste to half the Gulf Coast, flooded 80% of a major American city and killed close to 2,000 people. :re:

Your hysterical disaster-junkie silliness is the biggest waste of bandwidth on this board.

caonacl
11-21-2009, 05:07 PM
Wow! Some flooding in England. That is a real 'Katrina', like the one that laid waste to half the Gulf Coast, flooded 80% of a major American city and killed close to 2,000 people. :re:

Your hysterical disaster-junkie silliness is the biggest waste of bandwidth on this board.
CNN reported that this flooding was caused by the leftover energy from Hurricane Ida, that also reeked havoc on America's eastern seaboard.

caonacl
11-21-2009, 05:19 PM
A leftover tropical depression that dumped a lot of rain on England. :re: You actually cannot tell the difference between that and the Hurricane Katrina megadisaster. That fact illustrates my point with stark clarity. Every minor to moderate event is a 'Katrina' to you. You have a total lack of discernment between what is real, and what you wish to be real. And the fact that you desperately, painfully long for a real major disaster with real death toll to occur for your personal amusement is particularly horrifying.

This is not the forum to take this any further, so I am done with the topic.
I guess some people just are so apt to minimize the suffering of others.:mkay:

Ought Six
11-21-2009, 05:30 PM
My response is HERE (http://thisbluemarble.com/showthread.php?t=22096).

caonacl
11-21-2009, 09:13 PM
My response is HERE (http://thisbluemarble.com/showthread.php?t=22096).
:innocent:
Reply (http://thisbluemarble.com/showthread.php?p=169874#post169874)

Oric
11-22-2009, 04:41 AM
oppsss

Mousehound
11-22-2009, 07:20 AM
That rain is over us today, but not bad so far.

caonacl
11-22-2009, 12:55 PM
That rain is over us today, but not bad so far.
This is the down side of an inactive Atlantic hurricane season. Too much energy remains in the tropics causing the Hadley cell to expand into the North Atlantic. The result is much wetter weather for Europe....at least at first.
http://thisbluemarble.com/attachment.php?attachmentid=1944&stc=1&d=1258908906

Kassy
11-23-2009, 08:12 PM
'Katrina' is not a fit label for: everything remotely related to anything caused by a hurricane or tropical storm. 'Katrina' was also about leevies and response. The English situation is quite different.

caonacl
11-23-2009, 08:31 PM
'Katrina' is not a fit label for: everything remotely related to anything caused by a hurricane or tropical storm. 'Katrina' was also about leevies and response. The English situation is quite different.
Katrina is a metaphor for a big nasty flood event.....I'm poetical that way :cool: