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Arubi
08-24-2008, 11:31 AM
SEASONAL OUTLOOK FOR FALL 2008 & WINTER 2008/2009

According to my astrometeorological calculations on climate conditions, the fall season will arrive earlier than normal and will lead to an earlier than expected winter.

This winter will last from mid-November 2008 into May 2008 due to the cooler and wetter Spring of 2009, which will make this coming winter season seem longer than normal.

Winter, in my astrometeorological calculations, will begin on Saturday, November 13, 2008 and will extend to April 25, 2009. The biggest story of the winter will be the Air temperatures, making this one of the coldest winters for some time in North America.

Spring 2009 will be late, making the months of March, April and May 2009, wet and cooler than is normal for spring. From what I can determine from my calculations, Spring 2009 is muddled, cold, cloudy, with the climate still in the throes of winter, which does not want to seem to end until late April 2009. Warmer weather and clearer sping-like skies will not become more frequent until early June 2009.

I am forecasting a long winter for this reason, as I see spring 2009 arriving latter than usual, with a delay in climate and spring weather until early June for many regions of North America.

As August 2008 winds down, some of you may have noticed that the month of August hasn't been as hot and humid for much of the country, expect those on the west coast and the Pacific Northwest, which have been experiencing warmer-than-usual hot and steamy weather.

Those residing in the Midwest, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic and New England should have been aware of the cooler than normal August temperatures, especially those residing along the Canadian border, such as those in upstate New York, and those living near mountainous and valley regions.

Fall, for a majority of the country (excepting parts of the far west & PNW) will first be clear and chily, then wetter, and cold into late October, with winter's arrival by November 13th, about 18 days ahead of meteorological winter (Dec. 1) and a full five (5) weeks ahead of the Winter Solstice (Dec. 22) in the Northern Hemisphere.

My long-range weather forecast will include my assessment of winter's early arrival by mid-November, with some snows in October along the northern regions of North America, and with colder-than-normal temperatures for two-thirds of the country during the months of Sep. through November. This means a early fall season.

Those in mountain and valley regions should already see signs of the earlier onset of fall before mid-September's autumn equinox. Keen city dwellers in the East, and New England who are attuned to the signs in nature will see trees shedding leaves. The color of the leaves assist in shedding (no pun intended) the coming season of fall, and winter. More bright yellow colors of fallen leaves in August indicate a wet autumn with cooler-than-normal temperatures.

AUTUMN 2008
We are seeing lowered daytime temperatures in the East, Southeast, and Midwest range between 82-70 degrees with night-time temperatures in the 50s & 60s. Areas close to mountains and valleys have seen night temps in the mid-40s in late July and early August.

Areas as far north as Buffalo, N.Y. for example have had a wet summer with cooler-than-normal temperatures, and it has been a wetter than normal summer for the midwestern and parts of the Mid-Atlantic region. Farmers have been reporting wet hay fields because there has not been enough hot weather to dry the hay fields out.

This fall season will be clear, crisp and cooler-than-normal for many regions of North America. Fall conditions are arriving earlier than usual, and by second week of September it will be obvious to most that autumn is already here.

By the third week, everyone will be commenting on the cooler than normal temperatures and the spread of dry leaves everywhere. By that time, the fall equinox (Sept. 22) when the Sun enters tropical Libra, autumn will have already been here for the northern hemisphere.

The rainy season kicks off early too (in mid-September) and continues in early-to-mid October for some regions, and in early November in other regions. A very wet fall season after mid-September is ahead generally.

Early snows at higher elevations arrive the week of Sept. 22-29, with high wind conditions for New England, the Great Lakes, and all regions along the 49th Parallel bordering Canada.


PREVIEW OF WINTER'S EARLY ARRIVAL

Winter 2008-09, according to my assessment will be colder, and wetter than normal with increased snow and ice events for the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic. Winter is earlier than usual, with much colder temperatures than is normal for November and December. I've been forecasting a earlier than normal winter for this year in my comments since last year.

Frost season will begin from Sept. 7 through to October 31, 2008. Farmers and gardening enthusiasts should prepare earlier than normal for this frost season. After Sept. 15, expect to see signs of an earlier-than-normal rainy fall season for the Midwest, East, and Southeastern states. Colder temperatures in New England and the Great Lakes, with snow events at high elevations the week of Sept. 22-29.

This autumn season will also see the early signs of what will be be common this early winter: high winds & blizzards, and freezing rains. Most residents east of the Rockies in the U.S., should beware of very slick roads, and freezing rains this winter ~ mostly ice events ~ and should therefore be prepared for power outages by purchasing generators to run power in your homes and businesses.

Gusting winds throughout regions of the country pick up from October 19, 2008 and continue through December 27. There will be about ten (10) weeks of varying levels of gusting winds from mid-October to late December, making the colder-than-normal temperatures feel even colder throughout this period.

Arctic temperatures for two-thirds of the country (excepting the far west and Pacific Northwest) will occur between November 26 through to January 4, 2009. These arctic temperatures begin to recede slowly in January until the effects of the Pacific jet warms things up in late January.

I do not expect a strong Pacific jet until after January 25, 2009. This means the month of February 2009 will see temperatures rise after the pullback to the north of arctic air. However, February 6-9 brings another eastern snowstorm to the Mid-Atlantic states, then afterwards, a continuing warming up of the atmosphere the rest of February, but with still more threats of ice events because of the increase moisture in the atmosphere threatens the Southern Plains states, and Southeastern U.S. in February

Expect a stonger-than-normal northern jet stream this winter bringing about northwestern winds anf Alberta clipper systems into the Great Lakes, and upstate New York and New England with these clipper storms riding this wave also into the states of Ohio and Pennsylvania and into the Mid-Atlantic region.

December 5-12, 2008 shows snow and ice events for Southeastern & Central U.S., with colder than normal temperatures, heavy rains from the Gulf of Mexico combined with cold arctic air from Canada combining to prpduce snow and ice. Strong winds will make the storms damaging. The Central & Southern Rockies, and southern Plains into northern Texas will be affected, as well as states as Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Maryland, Virginia.

That early December 2008 winter event, for example, continues into the Mid-Atlantic region the week of Dec. 12-19, and will arrive by Friday, December 12, making for a messy weekend on the east coast and northeastern metropolitan areas with heavy snows in Philadelphia, New York, Washington D.C., and parts of the Southeast. Blizzard warnings due to the high winds will increase snow accumulations in the cities and suburbs. Roads will be treacherous the second and third weeks of December.

ASTROMET OUTLOOK
I expect about 2-1/2 snow storms a month from early December 2008 through to early March 2009 for the Rocky Mountains, the Southern Rockies, Cental & Southern Plain states, as well as the Southeastern, Central and Northeastern United States. This will make Winter 2009 memorable after several years of a relatively warm winters; especially in the Midwestern, Southern and Eastern U.S.


http://www.easternuswx.com/bb/index.php?act=home

Arubi
08-24-2008, 11:32 AM
continued....
CLIMATE CONDITIONS FOR WINTER 2008/2009

- Early onset of winter by Mid-November 2008
- Colder-than-normal temperatures
- Gusty Winds, blowing snows, blizzard conditions
- Strong Northwestern Winds
- Arctic Air
- Numerous Alberta Clippers
- Increased Gulf Mositure Mixing with Arctic Air

This winter will be colder-than-normal due to the lack of sunspot activity affecting the Earth's equator. Colder than normal winter temperatures (arctic air) are on tap this winter ahead with increased precipitation of freezing rains, snows and gusty winds mixing with the very cold air.

My outlook for the nation from the Continential Divide towards the entire two-thirds of the country is to prepare for a chilly early autumn and very cold winter season. Think and act about 4-5 weeks ahead of what one would normally do to prepare for fall and especially winter this year.

SPRING 2009 OUTLOOK
Next Spring is "muddled." That's the word I use because from all my calculations, spring is very slow to get up, and when it does, it is sluggish at best and takes it's time to get started.

February 2009's Pacific jet will warm the atmosphere over much the U.S., and during the latter half of the month of February, it will "appear" as if spring is one its way. However, it is not.

Spring-like weather will be seen in the Southern U.S. in early February. Do not be surprised to hear thunderstorms and see lightning in mid-February in the southern region of the country. There are strong potentials for tornados in February and the first 15 days of March 2009 throughout the southeastern U.S.

By March 6, 2009, a six-week Venus retrograde (Mar. 6 to April 17) will delay the onset of proper sping climate conditions relative to Earth's position to the Sun-Venus configuration. Prior Venus retrogrades before spring equinoxes in legacy data have shown very wet winter conditions returning over the course of about six-weeks ~ the exact length of most Venus retrogrades and delays in fuller spring climate conditions.

The climate by the next spring equinox (March 20, 2009) will see increased precipitation from the South to Central Midwestern states, to the Northeastern regions, including New England, with heavier-than-normal rains, particularly in April 2009, with the threat of a major Nor'easter along the Eastern U.S. from April 17-25.

The months of March and April 2009 show chillier than normal weather conditions. A damp, unsettled, and stormy climate throughout these two months. April 2009 is very windy, wet and cold, with winter-like days and colder-than-normal temperatures showing that spring will be delayed yet another month. According to my calculations, spring really does not fully bloom until the second week of June 2009.

Warmer temperatures from the continued Pacific jet will increase, as the northern jet falls further south, bringing with it heavy rains and increased gusty winds during all of April into the first week of May 2009.

SPRING 2009 CLIMATE

- Colder than normal
- Wetter than normal w/ heavy precipitation & freezing rains
- Windy (especially April 2009)
- Winter-like storms in March & April

A fuller, and more detailed astrometeorological forecast for the country will be published by early September for Winter/Spring 2009.

Theodore White, Astrolog.CSA
Classical Scientific Astrologer
Pro Astrometeorologist

"As Above, So Below."
www.spaceweather.com

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Theodore White; pro AstroMeteorologist.S
Classical Scientific Astrologer

It is more than possible, and probable. I've been forecasting for a long time, and know my expertise; especially long-range, which includes seasonal. The dates I've listed are exact. I never guess.

Well, most people in these times are not as versed in seeing long-range forecasts, especially those made by astrometeorologists. However, I learned classical scientific astrology by studying weather forecasting first at the age of 10 years old. I was trained early and have been forecasting all of my life (I'm now 45 yrs. old) and its' no big deal, at least to me.

There are uses for short-range, medium-range and long-range forecasting. I apply my skills in medium and long-range forecasting to help the general public, and companies who require forecasts for 30 days and longer ~ months and in some cases years in advance on climate conditions. This is normal in the science of astrometeorology, and quite normal for me, since I've been doing it for a long time.

As for snow: you will see it this December ~ before Christmas ~ on the dates I published. and it will be a more than a decent storm. I forecasted the Feb. 2006 storm that hit the east coast months in advance, to the day, and have done it many times before. This winter is not like the prior ones due to astronomical positions and the condition of the Sun this year, and next. Winter 2009 will be excellent for snowlovers, and will be more traditional like the ones before 1980. Forecasting long-range isn't a matter of "belief" but one of skills based on years of observation and study of astrometeorology. I range between 85-95% accuracy applying the princips of astrometeorological climate and weather forecasting.

This post has been edited by AstroMet: Aug 17 2008, 06:17 PM

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Theodore White; pro AstroMeteorologist.S
Classical Scientific Astrologer

You're going to get your wish this coming winter with a series of Alberta clipper systems. The East will have a magnificent winter this coming year, and it starts in November.
I am not predicting. I am forecasting. the word "prediction" has too many wacko connotations in these times for the word itself to be taken seriously. Meteorology was invented by ancient classical astrologers. It is one of the first branches of classical astrology, and is how weather was forecasted for centuries. Astronomy (stellar cartography) is another branch of classical astrology.

As for what the Sun and planets have to do with weather. The answer is everything. The planets modulate the electro-magnetic stream (Interplanetary Magnetic Field) that flows from the Sun, and which governs our planet's weather. Each season in both hemispheres of the Earth, the four major elements: air, earth, water, and fire, are governed by the motions, changes, and mathematical configurations of the Sun, Moon, and planets relative to the Earth's position as it moves through space. Without the revolution of the planets (including our own) there would be no time, nor weather, since both are always in motion.

--------------------

Theodore White; pro AstroMeteorologist.S
Classical Scientific Astrologer


I forecasted snows in early December, around Dec. 12th, for the I-95 corridor running through Pennsylvania. This snowfall will be more than just a damper, but shut down the metro areas due to it being the first major snow of the season, along with the fact that the last several winter seasons have seen about one major snow a season for most northeastern metron areas, with some minor winter events. This winter is different according to my calculations and with winter arriving early as I've forecasted, most people won't be ready.

I've been told that I scored about 87-96% accurate last year on my long-range climate and weather forecasts. I average around 85% ~ better when I have more time to exclusively work on North American climate and weather as well as weather worldwide. Any forecaster worth their salt will tell you how difficult and time-consuming forecasting is. Since everything is in constant motion forecasting is very tough, and is only for the hardy and skilled who are disciplined enough to keep working and refining their methods.

I've posted many of my forecasts on The Old Farmer's Alamanac over the years, and many of them are still there under my name "Theo." You can see for yourself and what others have said about my past forecasts for their own regions. The link is here ~

The Old Farmers Alamanac

kaneohegirl
08-24-2008, 12:14 PM
I was driving with my husband the other day a few weeks ago and was looking out the window (KIM that I have only lived here (MO) 3 years) and saw the bugs were making their nest/cocoon/spiderwebby things and told the hubby that winter is going to come earlier this year... he said why? how can you tell?.... I told him that this is the earliest I had seen those things make their nests in the trees and that they did that later in the summer/early fall the last few years.... he of course says pffft that means nothing... LMAO shows him huh?

M2M
08-24-2008, 08:32 PM
We've always called those web worms for what it's worth. They have been out earlier than I recall. The wooly worms are out sooner as well. I need to start filling the kerosene cans dh used to burn brush this spring/summer and forgot to refill.

kaneohegirl
08-24-2008, 08:40 PM
LOL yea there are LOTS of critters out here Im not used to.... but I gotta say them web worm webs in the trees give me the heeeby jeeebies LOL... do they even make anything pretty or what?

Arubi
08-24-2008, 10:44 PM
LOL yea there are LOTS of critters out here Im not used to.... but I gotta say them web worm webs in the trees give me the heeeby jeeebies LOL... do they even make anything pretty or what?

You're right! I didn't mention that because I figured no one would know what I was talking about. They're normal for mid to late Sept. Not now:no:

kaneohegirl
08-25-2008, 01:14 PM
I just ordered 2 cords of wood
wheeeee $320.00

US Blues
08-25-2008, 01:46 PM
I just ordered 2 cords of wood
wheeeee $320.00

that'll get ya 4/5ths of one chord here

385 a cord delivered for one chord,
wood supplier is 5 miles away

goatlady
08-25-2008, 02:48 PM
and "here" is WHERE??? USB.

Torange
08-25-2008, 10:11 PM
http://www.icecap.us/index.php


Aug 25, 2008
Climate Similar to the 1800s Within the Next 15 Years: First Stage of Global Cooling During 2008/09

By David Dilley, Meteorologist

In the peer reviewed book “Global Warming—Global Cooling, Natural Cause Found”, meteorologist and climate researcher David Dilley utilizes nearly a half million years of data linking long term gravitational cycles of the moon explain the recent global warming, rises in carbon dioxide levels, and for 2200 global warming cycles during the past half million years.

The gravitational cycles are called the Primary Forcing Mechanism for Climate (PFM), and act like a magnet by pulling the atmosphere’s high pressure systems northward or southward by as much as 3 or 4 degrees of latitude from their normal seasonal positions, and thus causing long-term shifts in the location of atmospheric high pressure systems.

Research by Mr. Dilley shows a near 100 percent correlation between the PFM gravitational cycles to the beginning and ending of global warming cycles. Global warming cycles began right on time with each PFM cycle during the past half million years, as did the current warming which began 100 years ago, and it will end right on time as the current gravitational cycle begins its cyclical decline.

Global temperatures have cooled during the past 12 months. During 2008 and 2009 the first stage of global cooling will cool the world’s temperatures to those observed during the years from the 1940s through the 1970s. By the year 2023 global climate will become similar to the colder temperatures experienced during the 1800s.

Mr. Dilley of Global Weather Oscillations has found seven different types of recurring gravitational cycles ranging from the very warm 460,000 year cycle down to a 230 year recurring global warming cycle. All of the gravitational cycles coincide nearly 100 percent with 2200 global warming events during the past half million years. This includes the earth’s current warming cycle which began around the year 1900, and the first stage of global cooling that will begin during 2008 and 2009.

The release of the book “Global Warming- Global Cooling, Natural Cause Found” culminates 19 years of research clearly linking gravitational cycles as the cause for fluctuations within the earth’s climate. The book is available as an electronic e-Book on this website. The author David Dilley is a meteorologist and climate researcher with Global Weather Oscillations Inc. (GWO), former meteorologist with the National Weather Service, and co-host of the radio program “the Politically Incorrect Weather Guys” airing weekly on RadioEarNetwork.com, an internet streaming radio program. Read more here. He also believes a moderate El Nino will occur this fall. See here.

Icecap Note: Ian Wilson has found a similar correlation between planetary/gravitational cycles and the major ocean oscillations, the PDO and NAO in this powerpoint.

Dr. Gary Sharp of Its All About time forwarded them to us with note “Two independently originated studies that provide useful insights about the future. Both studies agree well with what the Russian folks have been using to make projections about the future rise and fall of regional fisheries species - but they could not identify the causal forces - just the natural cycles. Read, learn, and enjoy the warmth - while it is still here...!”

Fiddlerdave
08-26-2008, 05:41 PM
In the peer reviewed book “Global Warming—Global Cooling, Natural Cause Found”, meteorologist and climate researcher David Dilley utilizes nearly a half million years of data linking long term gravitational cycles of the moon explain the recent global warming, rises in carbon dioxide levels, and for 2200 global warming cycles during the past half million years.

The gravitational cycles are called the Primary Forcing Mechanism for Climate (PFM), and act like a magnet by pulling the atmosphere’s high pressure systems northward or southward by as much as 3 or 4 degrees of latitude from their normal seasonal positions, and thus causing long-term shifts in the location of atmospheric high pressure systems.

Research by Mr. Dilley shows a near 100 percent correlation between the PFM gravitational cycles to the beginning and ending of global warming cycles. Global warming cycles began right on time with each PFM cycle during the past half million years, as did the current warming which began 100 years ago, and it will end right on time as the current gravitational cycle begins its cyclical decline.

:tin:

BirdGuano
08-26-2008, 06:13 PM
I just ordered 2 cords of wood
wheeeee $320.00

$35 wood cutting permit from the county, good for a month of cutting
in designated areas.
$60 in gas

As much as you can fit in two full-size pickup trucks, as many trips
as you can make in a month.

preppiechick
08-26-2008, 10:46 PM
$35 wood cutting permit from the county, good for a month of cutting
in designated areas.
$60 in gas

As much as you can fit in two full-size pickup trucks, as many trips
as you can make in a month.

I was waiting for the credit card line...

"sitting in front of a fire without a gas bill...priceless!!!

I never realized that so many lived so close to me. :clap: I'm in mo, too- just the other side!

kaneohegirl
08-27-2008, 08:30 AM
$35 wood cutting permit from the county, good for a month of cutting
in designated areas.
$60 in gas

As much as you can fit in two full-size pickup trucks, as many trips
as you can make in a month.

wonders how to find out about that.... My dad taught me real young how to fall a tree... Id rent a uhal tho since I dont own a truck

Riley
08-31-2008, 01:58 PM
I live in South Alabama and this has been the coolest August I can remember. Usually it's extremely hot with the first hint of fall not until mid-September, but this year that happened a couple of weeks ago. Of course, it warmed right back up but I think we're going to have a colder winter this year also.

nanna
08-31-2008, 02:12 PM
Trees already starting to turn here in the mid-Hudson Valley (NYS).

We've already had several nights in the low 40s (in August!!!).

Got sweaters?



nanna

PatS
09-06-2008, 01:42 PM
Arubi, Any predictions for us left-coasters?

Arubi
11-11-2008, 09:34 PM
Hi Pat!
Sorry to be so long answering, I've been busy.;) Try this link. I keep my eastern link bookmarked;

http://www.westernusawx.com/

and I like this, the Old Farmers Almanac...it's something interesting to watch:yes:
http://www.almanac.com/forum/list.php?9