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Lars
01-27-2009, 03:21 PM
Jan 27, 09

http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20090127/ts_alt_afp/uswarmingenvironmentclimate_20090127132619

Global warming 'irreversible' for next 1000 years: study









(AFP) – Climate change is "largely irreversible" for the next 1,000 years even if carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions could be abruptly halted, according to a new study led by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The study's authors said there was "no going back" after the report showed that changes in surface temperature, rainfall and sea level are "largely irreversible for more than 1,000 years after CO2 emissions are completely stopped."

NOAA senior scientist Susan Solomon said the study, published in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal, showed that current human choices on carbon dioxide emissions are set to "irreversibly change the planet."

Researchers examined the consequences of CO2 building up beyond present-day concentrations of 385 parts per million, and then completely stopping emissions after the peak. Before the industrial age CO2 in Earth's atmosphere amounted to only 280 parts per million.

The study found that CO2 levels are irreversibly impacting climate change, which will contribute to global sea level rise and rainfall changes in certain regions.

The authors emphasized that increases in CO2 that occur from 2000 to 2100 are set to "lock in" a sea level rise over the next 1,000 years.

Rising sea levels would cause "irreversible commitments to future changes in the geography of the Earth, since many coastal and island features would ultimately become submerged," the study said.

Decreases in rainfall that last for centuries can be expected to have a range of impacts, said the authors. Regional impacts include -- but are not limited to -- decreased human water supplies, increased fire frequency, ecosystem change and expanded deserts.

rc
01-27-2009, 03:37 PM
Well, since it's irreversible, there's no sense worrying about it.

The new irreversible reality of a warmer earth does mean that we'll need much more air conditioning, so we better get to work building more coal power plants to run all of them.

BirdGuano
01-27-2009, 04:16 PM
(AFP) Climate change is "largely irreversible" for the next 1,000 years even if carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions could be abruptly halted, according to a new study led by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

That's because it's a cycle, and a has happened several tens of thousands of years ago, long before industrial emissions contributed any CO2.

Exodia
01-27-2009, 04:16 PM
How does more liquid water in the system lead to decreased rainfall?

BirdGuano
01-27-2009, 04:17 PM
How does more liquid water in the system lead to decreased rainfall?

Ice Age. :D

Sysiphus
01-27-2009, 08:07 PM
How does more liquid water in the system lead to decreased rainfall?

I don't think they are talking about an overall decrease in rainfall, but rather that some regions would become more prone to severe and long term droughts. Of course, what they don't mention is that other regions would become less susceptible to droughts. Anyways, the models are a bunch of poppycock and no one can predict what is really going to happen.

shalym
01-27-2009, 08:17 PM
Woo-hoo!! I got to move my first thread! Thank you Lars...I'll always remember this moment :)

Shari

Exodia
01-27-2009, 09:35 PM
I don't think they are talking about an overall decrease in rainfall, but rather that some regions would become more prone to severe and long term droughts. Of course, what they don't mention is that other regions would become less susceptible to droughts. Anyways, the models are a bunch of poppycock and no one can predict what is really going to happen.OK. The way I look at it, it's a dynamic system: there will always some area increasing in rainfall and some areas decreasing. To me this was a tug at the heart strings -- see, by driving your SUV, people are going to die of dehydration.