Go Back   This Blue Marble, a Global Current Events Discussion Forum > Our Homestead > Outdoors > Hunting, Fishing, Camping and Bushcraft

 
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Prev Previous Post   Next Post Next
Old 02-06-2009, 06:26 PM   #1
BirdGuano
H1N1 Crash Dummy
 
BirdGuano's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: The I.O.U. State
Posts: 8,961
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default How to build an upside down fire

See the link for pix and video.

http://www.fourhourworkweek.com/blog...ire/#more-1130

How would you like to light a fire perfectly and have it burn for 3-7 hours without touching it or putting on more wood? It can be done, every time, but it requires forgetting everything you’ve learned about starting fires…

I have — as most boys and men do — fancied myself quite a fire-maker.

I can make a raging furnace like the world has never seen, a crackling and screaming banshee of life-giving heat that springs to life. This lasts for a euphoric five minutes. Then the real fun begins: the fiddling and fussing, poking and prodding, every five minutes thereafter for the next hour to keep the charred remains clinging to life.

I was in the Boy Scouts and learned the ropes from men who repeated the steps like religious commandments: tons of paper and tinder at the bottom, building up like a tipi (teepee) with the smallest kindling at the bottom and the biggest logs at the top. It’s how fires are built, right?

Let’s call this the “tipi” fire.

Here’s the problem: sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t work at all. It requires dry wood. I needed a fire-building method that worked every time with all types of wood, whether dried like an octogenarian in Palm Springs, or bordering on waterlogged, like most of the wood we had at home, which had been rained on due to a punctured tarp.

Enter the Upside-Down Fire.

To learn the manliest of the manly arts, it took one of my most feminine readers, Marcie, who also happens to help moderate the forum. She was looking for the best method of starting fires for her mountain-side cabin, and the final result was as odd as it is effective.

Even I couldn’t believe this one until I tried it.

The method is simplicity itself: do exactly the opposite of the tipi method.

1) Put the largest logs at the bottom, ensuring there is no space at all between them.

2) Put a second layer of smaller logs on top of the largest, again ensuring there are no spaces between them.

3) Repeat until you get to the top, where you will have strips of crumpled paper and — at the very top — 3-5 fire-starter squares (my preference) or fire-starter oil sticks. My favorite sequence from bottom to top is large logs (unsplit), split logs, sapling wood, cedar shingle wood, then paper and fire-starting squares.
__________________
--

Quote:
"It is better to have lived one day as a tiger than a thousand years as a sheep." -- Tibetan proverb
News and commentary updates on Twitter @guanosphere
BirdGuano is offline   Reply With Quote
 

Tags
build, fire, upside

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:01 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright © Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.