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Old 10-23-2016, 10:26 AM   #1
CajunSunshine
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Default Water filter made from tree branch removes bacteria

http://ecopreneurist.com/2014/02/27/...coli-bacteria/


A low-tech water filter system made from a branch of a tree can filter up to four liters of water per day, removing up to 99% of E. coli bacteria and producing fresh, uncontaminated, drinking water.

A team at MIT used a small piece of sapwood, which contains xylem tissue that transports sap inside the tree, to build an effective water filter that could make a big difference in places where contaminated water is the norm. By using this type of filter, rural communities may be able to solve some of their water issues in a low-cost and efficient manner.


...The team used white pine branches, with the outer bark stripped off, and secured the pieces in a piece of plastic tubing to create the water filter. Sapwood, which is made up of porous tissue called xylem, moves sap from the trees’ roots to their crowns with a system of tiny pores and vessels, and lends itself naturally to the task of filtering water of contaminants measuring as small as 70 nanometers.

While the team used white pine for their initial study, they will also be looking at the potential of using other types of sapwood as a filter, including flowering trees, which have smaller pores and could be used to filter out additional contaminants.



I would like to keep an eye on this MIT team and their findings!



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Old 10-23-2016, 12:04 PM   #2
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Nice but I have a hard time how you would get this the field. I don't think you are going to get people in developing countries working trees into a field model.

Pre-filtering when sand, cloth, etc. then following up with SODIS method still is the best for me. http://www.sodis.ch/methode/index_EN
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Old 10-26-2016, 09:16 PM   #3
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In depth article concerning the xylem filtration process...........

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/art...l.pone.0089934
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Old 10-27-2016, 01:50 AM   #4
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Thank you GhostFinger! Very nice!


This bit especially piqued my interest:

Remarkably, it was observed that 20 nm gold colloids could not pass through inter-vessel pit membranes of some deciduous tree species, indicating an adequate size rejection to remove viruses from water.


According to http://www.plantphysiol.org/content/131/1/41.short, and a bit of Googling around Wikipedia shows that the 4 tree species that were used in this part of the study were:

Alphitonia excelsa. (commonly known as the red ash or soap tree... a species in the Rhamnaceae family. It is endemic to Australia, being found in New South Wales, Queensland, Northern Territory and the northeastern tip of Western Australia. The Rhamnaceae are a large family of flowering plants, mostly trees, shrubs, and some vines, commonly called the buckthorn family)

Gossia bidwillii. (known as the python tree is a rainforest myrtle of eastern Australia. Other common names include Lignum-vitae, Scrub Ironwood and Smooth-barked Ironwood.)

Hmm..Ironwood... Ironwood is a common name for a large number of woods that have a reputation for hardness. Usage of the name may (or may not) include the tree that yields this wood. Some of the related American species are:

Acacia estrophiolata, Southern ironwood
Acacia stenophylla, Ironwood
Carpinus caroliniana, American hornbeam

Cochlospermum gillivraei. According to http://anpsa.org.au/c-gil.html, this is another Australian species. Cochlospermum is a genus of about 20 species with four occurring in Australia.

Brachychiton australis. Brachychiton australis, commonly known as the broad-leaved bottle tree, is a small tree of the genus Brachychiton found in eastern Australia.[1] It was originally classified in the family Sterculiaceae, which is now within Malvaceae.

The Malvaceae, or the mallows, are a family of flowering plants estimated to contain 244 genera with 4225 known species.[2][3] Well-known members of this family include okra, cotton, and cacao. The largest genera in terms of number of species include Hibiscus (300 species)


I hope someday virus-removal testing is done on American species. (I would gladly trade my kingdom for a well-equipped lab!)

Because every water purification method has its advantages and disadvantages/limitations, I am always interested in exploring new ways of purifying water.



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Old 10-27-2016, 08:17 PM   #5
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I read that whole paper and still don't see how you could make a field version.

As for something used in developing countries made locally? No way.
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Old 10-29-2016, 05:14 AM   #6
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Quote:
I read that whole paper and still don't see how you could make a field version.
Well I did not read the whole paper
but perhaps you are assuming as I was , that the wood
needs to be vertical .

So long as the the wood is sealed to prevent surface
external flow why could it not be in a horizontal PVC
pipe , near horizontal or possibly even inverted ?

..
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Last edited by Ross; 10-29-2016 at 05:51 AM.
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