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Old 03-03-2017, 12:05 PM   #1
A.T. Hagan
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Default Mass graves found in disused sewers at a former Catholic orphanage in Ireland

following decades of suspicion that hundreds of babies were buried in unmarked sites

Remains found at Bon Secours Mother and Baby Home in County Galway, Ireland
There could be as many as 800 dead, ranging from 35 weeks to three years old
The bodies may have been placed in an old sewer, which was disused in 1937
In the 1970s, local boys found a pile of bones in an underground chamber


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...baby-home.html


A mass grave containing the remains of babies and young children
has been discovered at the former Bon Secours Mother and Baby
Home in Tuam, County Galway (file picture from 2014)
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Old 03-03-2017, 02:08 PM   #2
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Reminds me of the film Philomena.

Good film but heartbreaking.
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Old 03-03-2017, 03:08 PM   #3
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Aww Bless them all.
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Old 03-04-2017, 12:02 AM   #4
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Most were buried in the 1950's? Some of the perps have to still be alive.
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Old 03-04-2017, 01:25 AM   #5
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Most were buried in the 1950's? Some of the perps have to still be alive.
But what did they die from ?

..
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Old 03-04-2017, 03:13 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Ross View Post
But what did they die from ?

..
Malnutrition? I remember food rationing was still around back then.

I suspect Ireland might have been worse off.

Last edited by BuilderBob; 03-04-2017 at 03:19 AM. Reason: spelling
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Old 03-04-2017, 08:41 AM   #7
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Poverty, malnutrition, and disease.

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In 1948 Dr.Noël Browne, a new T.D. for Clann na Poblachta, and a socialist, became Minister for Health in a coalition government. Browne was an admirer of Fianna Fáil's 1947 Health Act[4] and intended to implement its provisions as part of a plan to reduce the alarmingly high rate of child mortality (especially from tuberculosis) in Ireland.
I grew up Irish Catholic in America. Now, priests own their own homes, and nice new cars, and take vacations. Back then the clergy took their vows of poverty seriously. They didn't get a salary. The Church "took care of them". Their rooms were a spartan bed with a cross over it, a chair, and a hook for their single set of clothing. No rug. No covering on the window. The only vacation they got was a prayer retreat to a Church property. My parents, who struggled to provide for their own young family, would have a priest or nun for dinner every night (we lived behind the church, so they were also our neighbors) just to make sure each of them had a decent meal now and then. I remember my mother taking up a collection to buy my kindergarten teacher, Sister Katerina, a new habit, because hers was so faded, threadbare and worn it was falling apart as she wore it. Our Christmas gifts to teachers were baskets with toothpaste, a new hairbrush, and toiletries. They would send the contents of their baskets to Ireland, because they had it worse.

There was a lot of immigration from Ireland during that time, and a lot of adoptions.

I know the girls in the homes for unwed mothers were badly mistreated according to the standards we have today, and I have no doubt that babies and children who could have been saved but for an antibiotic or trip to the ER, died and were buried because there was no money for such things (another word for "God's Will"). But we need to look at this through the context of the times, and recognize how far we have come.
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Old 03-04-2017, 09:38 AM   #8
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If food was scarce I was wondering about confiscation by more
powerful older kids or even by the clergy .
Who would have prepared the food ?

...
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Old 03-04-2017, 11:37 AM   #9
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The homes for unwed mothers were managed by nuns. In the hierarchy of the Church, the Cardinals and Bishops ate well. Parish priests ate the same as locals. (They all had cooks and housekeepers who looked after everyone living in the parish house.) Nuns were on the bottom of the list. They were servants. In such situations there may well have been food envy (and I am sure power plays, pecking orders, and all the other lovely psychological issues when people live together in a state of mutual deprivation) but I suspect the meals given to children, mothers, and nuns weren't much different.
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Old 03-27-2017, 09:27 AM   #10
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Now these "laundries" were found all over the world, not just Ireland, but this is indicative of the ones found there as well.

Life in a Magdalene laundry: Haunting images show children raised in cruel orphanages around the world 'as punishment for their mothers' sins'

Quote:
Images show the everyday life at Magdalene Laundries around the world through the early 1900s
The establishments were set-up to house 'fallen women', who had children out of wedlock
Many former occupants of homes have spoken out about the abuse they suffered at the laundries
Named after the Bible's Mary Magdalene, the homes were used to reform so-called 'fallen women'
They expanded to take in girls who were considered 'promiscuous', unmarried mothers, the criminal, mentally unwell and girls who were seen as a burden on their families
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/arti...Laundries.html


The establishments, like the Sean Ross Abbey mother and baby
home in Tipperary, Ireland (pictured above), were set-up to house
'fallen women', a term that was used to imply female sexual
promiscuity, when in reality they were women who had children out
of wedlock
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