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Old 08-25-2014, 11:59 AM   #51
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I think we posted the same study, sonny.

I'm sorry, I'm not trying to be difficult, cantankerous, pig headed, nay-saying or anything like that. I'm certainly not to be any more clueless about this outbreak than I am already.

It's simply getting to the point where there's almost too much 'information' out there. Much of it is confusing, contradictory; some is hysterical & often the really interesting stuff is quietly buried as a line or two in an article discussing something else entirely.

And then you find stuff from so far out in left field...
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Old 09-02-2014, 05:52 PM   #52
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sonny View Post
The Japanese government said it is willing to provide a drug developed in its laboratories to treat Influenza.

Google translation from:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/afrique/monde/2...ola_t705.shtml

Favipiravir
called (or "T-705") and marketed under the name Avigan, it could be offered to patients in accordance with the manufacturer, Toyama Chemical.

Compared to the experimental treatment ZMapp, the T-705 has the advantage of having been approved in Japan in March as qu'antiviral against influenza.

It is currently undergoing clinical testing ( in stage III human trials in the United States. Stage I and Stage II clinical trials completed)


Experts say the administration as tablets may facilitate treatment in areas with limited medical facilities.

Japanese authorities want to make available to patients in countries affected by Ebola country

The secretary general of the Japanese government Yoshihide Suga said that Tokyo is "willing to deliver the drug in cooperation with the manufacturer if the World Health Organization (WHO) so requests"

There is currently no vaccine or antiviral approved against the Ebola virus, which is among the most contagious and deadly in humans which can cause death within a few days.

The ZMapp has cured two American doctors, but a Spanish priest who had benefited died.

The World Health Organization has approved mid-August the use of unapproved treatments.

~

Nigeria Govt Requests Drug, T-705, From Japan.
...


"Following the the Treatment Research Group (TRG)'s recommendation and in consultation with NAFDAC and NHREC, Nigeria has submitted a detailed profile and brief on the oral antiviral agent which the Japanese Government has offered to make available to affected countries through the WHO. We are now considering the profile and brief to enable us reach a final decision on making it available to our patients."

He explained that "our initial knowledge of the agent is that it has been shown to have strong antiviral activity against the influenza virus following phases I and II human trails, it is now going through phase III clinical trails; it is shown to have strong antiviral property against Ebola virus in vitro and in vivo.

These and the fact that it is considered safe, having passed through phase I and II clinical trails makes it good candidate drug for use in emergency situation as the EVD."

http://allafrica.com/stories/201409020288.html
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Old 09-02-2014, 06:07 PM   #53
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France’s Inserm in Talks With Guinea on Ebola Drug Trials

Aug 29, 2014

France’s state health institute, Inserm, is in talks with Guinea authorities on the first clinical trials of experimental Ebola therapies on patients ill with the virus in the West African country.

Inserm is considering two trials, each involving at most 15 patients, to test compounds from Fujifilm Holdings Corp. (4901) and Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Corp. (TKMR), said Jean-Francois Delfraissy, director of Inserm’s Institute of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Discussions with Guinea officials began this week and no decision has been made, he said.

“We are at the stage of starting to talk with authorities, to see whether this can potentially be done, for patients who don’t have too many symptoms yet,” Delfraissy said in a telephone interview today.

Sakoba Keita, head of the epidemic prevention unit at Guinea’s Health Ministry, confirmed that Guinea is in talks with France on the experimental Ebola treatments. “There has been as yet no letter of formalization, but an agreement in principle has been obtained,” Keita said by phone today.
...

Inserm also is discussing the trials with the Geneva-based WHO and Doctors Without Borders, Delfraissy said. The French institute may consider moving on to other countries later, Delfraissy also said.

“For now, it’s Guinea,” he said. “If we were to go elsewhere afterward it would be Liberia, where the situation is even more complicated. We have contacts there as well, with clinicians, but we have had no contact with Liberian authorities.”
...

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-0...la-trials.html

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Old 09-02-2014, 06:18 PM   #54
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Favipiravir also known as T-705 is an experimental anti-viral drug with activity against many RNA viruses. Like some other experimental antiviral drugs (T-1105 and T-1106), it is a pyrazinecarboxamide derivative.

Favipiravir is active against influenza viruses, West Nile virus, Yellow fever virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus as well as other flaviviruses, arenaviruses, bunyaviruses and alphaviruses.[1]

The mechanism of its actions is thought to be related to the selective inhibition of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Favipiravir does not inhibit RNA of DNA synthesis in mammalian cells and is not toxic to them.[1]

In 2014, Favipiravir was approved in Japan for stockpiling against influenza pandemics.[2] The drug appears to be useful in treating a mouse model of Ebola virus disease.[3][4][5] During the 2014 West Africa Ebola virus outbreak, Japan offered to supply the drug if requested by the WHO.[6]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Favipiravir


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Old 09-03-2014, 10:24 PM   #55
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I put this in Flu Clinic a month or so ago before Ebola became the big thing.

http://bigstory.ap.org/article/ebola...tobacco-plants

In a nut shell, Tobacco plants in NC are used to make MZAPP. I have done a little work in the tobacco industry. I do not smoke any more - but I love the smell of freshly cured tobacco. Anyway, good article. The reason more MZAPP is not available is because they might have to grow the plant to get the vax. That takes time.
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Old 09-04-2014, 02:21 PM   #56
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ZMapp, maybe 200 doses by year's end.

...

There are hopes, Kieny said, that if production can be ramped up that perhaps 200 doses of the drug could be available by the end of the year.
...

Experts meet in Geneva on use of experimental Ebola drugs, vaccines

By Helen Branswel
The Canadian Press

http://globalnews.ca/news/1542972/ex...rugs-vaccines/

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Old 09-04-2014, 02:37 PM   #57
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To produce the 10 grams of antibodies needed for a single course of ZMapp, Mapp Biopharmaceutical currently requires 30 to 50 kilograms of tobacco leaves _ the capacity of a small greenhouse.

Dr. Robin Robinson, director of the department's Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority, said the first lot of ZMapp "is now under production." That lot will be used in human trials scheduled to begin at the end of 2014 and to conduct additional animal studies of its safety and effectiveness, he said.
...

http://hdnews.net/news/nationworld/U-S- ... -drug-work

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Old 09-05-2014, 12:18 PM   #58
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Ebola vaccine trial begins on the "Canadian VSV-Ebov" vax.

September 4, 2014
NewLink Genetics said today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has given the pharmaceutical company permission to proceed with Phase 1 clinical trials of its vaccine.

"We are preparing Phase 1 studies in North America, Europe and Africa, and recently signed agreements with third-party manufacturers to scale up vaccine production," said Dr. Charles Link, NewLink's CEO and chief scientific officer, in a statement.

The trials will evaluate how healthy adults respond to various doses of the vaccine, the company said in a statement. About 40 healthy adult volunteers will be immunized with the vaccine and then followed to evaluate the safety and durability of the vaccine.

NewLink is working with a vaccine initially developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada. The company said the vaccine has shown effectiveness when given to non-human primates infected with Ebola.

http://www.desmoinesregister.com/sto...ials/15062789/

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Old 09-05-2014, 08:13 PM   #59
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Two Day WHO Conference on experimental Ebola drugs
"First Priority should be "Whole Blood Therapies""

At a two day meeting in Geneva organized by the World Health Organization nearly 200 experts from around the world met to discuss the use of experimental Ebola drugs, vaccines.

Experts at the WHO meeting concluded that the first priority should be "whole blood" therapies, or transfusions from patients who have survived Ebola, because survivors may have natural antibodies capable of recognizing and fighting the virus. Before Brantly received ZMapp, he received a blood donation from a teenager who had survived the disease.
....
Yeah read it.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/n...aska/15119223/


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Last edited by Sonny; 09-05-2014 at 08:21 PM.
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Old 09-05-2014, 08:16 PM   #60
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I am currently in North Carolina. The South-East US could easily grow enough tobacco for vax for the world - many times over. The problem is the seed. It would take years to grow enough of the right seed?!

Tobacco, cotton, and peanuts vie with corn and soy beans for acres and water.

Another hurdle would be the curing of the leaves. Most of the curing capability has been destroyed. Tobacco has a long and tricky curing cycle. Oddly, water is used in curing.

Another issue is the machines to harvest tobacco. A tobacco plant is continually harvested until it runs out of leaves. It might take weeks to completely harvest a plant.

SE US Farmers would see a gold mine. If there were a stampede to grow tobacco, on a "Manhattan Project" level, it could very easily be done (if the seed is available) for a few billion people. However, the price of food will skyrocket causing famine!!!!!

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Old 09-05-2014, 08:33 PM   #61
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Interesting info about whole blood transfusions. I recall when that was used at the tail end of the Kikwit outbreak in 95. The western medical folks there were adamant this was a Bad Idea. By western standards... it was, as the blood was untested for Hep anything, HIV & other nasties. The argument & it's a valid one, is that in the absence of Ebola testing & these were PRESUMED, not lab confirmed cases; you risked giving them Ebola when they might havce something else or transfusing them with something just as nasty. I BELIEVE some rudimentary HIV testing was carried out - I may be wrong.

The Zairian doctors did it anyway - they had nothing else to offer & the first recipient was a much loved & respected coworker - a nurse that had been busting her butt caring for the sick.

All save 1 recovered, I believe. Was it the transfusions? Were they getting better anyway? That was never clear.

Those same risks remain, so the fact that the WHO would consider it leads me to think they're rummaging through the 'desperate' pile for treatment ideas.

That being said, there's an argument to be made for offering the recovered a 'job'. For a decent renumeration, give them thorough physicals, including blood work. As quickly as possible, remedy nutritional deficiencies, (feed them!), & other illnesses they may have. When their basic health is sound, take blood ast reasonable intervals in order to use for transfusions.

Properly done, this could accomplish some decent things. It would help the formerly ill recuperate - at least the basic health care & feeding would! If they're so inclined, it's a way to give back - even though paid. It would keep them from starving to death. If they're interested, teach them to become community educators. Allow others in the community to SEE what's happening - keep it transparent. Explain in simple terms the principles behind what's going on. ome might be convinced western medicine isn't evil.

Heck, long term, who knows if some bright young people might not be convinced to go into health care or other public servie in those countries.

Hey, I can't always be a cynical doomer!
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Old 09-07-2014, 03:40 PM   #62
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My understanding is that a course of ZMapp is three individual doses given by IV every other day. Each IV is infused over a 12 hour period.

British Nurse William Pooley, had a mild case, He said he had "some pretty high temperature for a few days from the day I was evacuated" but "I never had any vomiting"..
http://www.cbsnews.com/news/zmapp-cu...f-ebola-virus/
Of the seven people known to have been treated with ZMapp, two have died -- a Liberian doctor and a Spanish priest. The priest received only one of three planned doses. Two Africans who received ZMapp in Liberia -- a Congolese doctor and a Liberian physician's assistant who were expected to be released from a treatment center on Friday. A British nurse also got the drug, reportedly the two unused doses left over from treating the Spanish priest...[/quote]
__

http://www.onmedica.com/NewsArticle....c-03b467a5b345
The doses of ZMapp are believed to have been sourced in Spain. Last month, the drug was made available to doctors in Madrid treating a Spanish missionary priest who contracted Ebola while working in West Africa, but died in Madrid. It is believed that the priest received only one of three doses sent, making the other two doses available to Mr Pooley.

Be that as it may, I still wonder why only one Course ZMapp which is three doses, were sent to Liberia when both Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol were infected at the same time?.

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Old 09-08-2014, 10:09 AM   #63
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Potential new vaccine shows considerable efficacy with just one dose, but may require a "booster."

http://news.yahoo.com/monkey-study-e...110458070.html
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Old 09-08-2014, 10:11 PM   #64
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Dr. Rick Sacra is receiving an unnamed experimental Ebola Drug, not ZMapp.

But based on the side affects his wife described in the article below it's seems possibly the drug being used to treat Dr. Sacra is Tekmira Pharm's TKM_Ebola..

The FDA had halted a drug trail in July due to nausea and vomiting experienced when higher doses of the drug were used.
http://auburnpub.com/business/fda-li...a4bcf887a.html
____


The family of Dr. Rick Sacra said he was able to eat breakfast Monday for the first time since arriving Friday at the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha.

The 51-year-old remains in stable condition. But his wife, Debbie, said Sacra is more alert and that they had a half-hour conversation by video conference Sunday.

"He hasn't been able to eat much since he got here, but he had some toast and apple sauce," Debbie Sacra said. "He also tolerated the research drug well — better than he had the previous doses he was given."
...

Sacra is being treated with an experimental drug that is different than the one given to the two Americans treated for Ebola at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta. Dr. Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, who also work for SIM, have recovered.

Sacra came to Omaha instead of Atlanta because federal officials asked the medical center to treat him in order to prepare other isolation units to take more Ebola patients if needed.

Sacra's doctors have refused to name the drug they are using, but they say they've been consulting with experts on Ebola on his treatment.


Dr. Aneesh Mehta of Emory University said Monday that it was impossible to know if the experimental ZMapp they received worked.

But Mehta said Emory doctors have been advising other physicians that some particular types of supportive care did seem to help. Those included switching between different types of IV fluids to meet each patient's specific electrolyte needs at the time. And giving high-quality liquid nutrition to boost their levels of protein and other nutrients "to help build back that immune system that was under attack."

Mehta and other experts were discussing Ebola at the American Society for Microbiology meeting Monday.

Pharmaceutical companies are developing vaccines for Ebola and drugs to help treat the virus, but they're not fully tested or readily available yet.

Dr. Gary Kobinger of the Public Health Agency of Canada helped pioneer the research that led to ZMapp, and he said the U.S. manufacturer appears to be on track for a Phase 1 safety study early next year, perhaps as early as January, although no drug is available currently.

On the vaccine front, Kobinger said a Canadian-made candidate should be starting Phase 1 trials within weeks.

WHO has suggested turning to the blood of Ebola survivors as an experimental treatment, and Sacra's doctors have said they are considering that.

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2014/0...anta-hospital/

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Last edited by Sonny; 09-08-2014 at 10:36 PM.
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Old 09-11-2014, 11:59 PM   #65
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WHO fast-tracks use of experimental drugs for Ebola

The World Health Organization is launching a crash programme to test experimental treatments on people who have Ebola, in an emergency bid to stem the epidemic. The move will get round regulatory barriers that have so far stopped one promising drug that is almost fully tested from being used in the epidemic.[favipiravir]

....
Only a few hundred doses of ZMapp will be available by December, says the WHO, and they need to be kept frozen, which could be difficult in West Africa. Similarly, by March next year the Canadian firm Tekmira might be able to make 900 doses of a small RNA treatment called TKM-Ebola that interferes with viral replication, however it requires slow infusion into the patient, which could also be difficult.
...

More promising might be two wide-spectrum antiviral drugs, BCX4430 and favipiravir. Both resemble the nucleotide molecules that make up the virus's RNA genome, and fool the virus's RNA-copying enzyme – but not a human's – into using them, crippling viral replication.

In fact it seems only regulatory red tape, of the sort the WHO now wants to eliminate, has prevented the use of favipiravir in the outbreak so far. A candidate anti-flu drug, it has already been extensively tested in humans, and was reported in March to save mice from Ebola even when given six days after infection. Japan is giving some to Nigeria and 20,000 doses are available.
....

read full article at
http://www.newscientist.com/article/...for-ebola.html

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Old 09-17-2014, 09:45 AM   #66
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Some news from the dark side:

Quote:
The black market for Ebola survivors’ blood

snip

Convalescent serum — serum collected from someone who has survived an infectious disease — has been used to treat Ebola victims. Most recently, it was given to 51-year-old American aid worker Rick Sacra from survivor Kent Brantly. Blood from Ebola survivors is rich with antibodies against the deadly virus, and since there is currently no approved drug to fight it, some have become desperate enough to take fate into their own hands and turn to the black market for the experimental serum.

But WHO is concerned about the illicit trade, since giving a patient someone else’s blood can cause anaphylactic shock and death or infect with other diseases such as HIV if the blood is tainted. For that reason, the United Nations health agency said it will work with governments to stamp out the black market, WHO Director-General Margaret Chan said, and establish a safe system for collecting, storing and re-injecting blood.
http://www.washingtonpost.com/news/m...9-3012c1cd8d1e
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Old 09-18-2014, 03:27 PM   #67
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Ebola Survivor William Pooley is flown to Atlanta to give doctor with virus emergency blood transfusion

Sounds like he's not doing very well.

Not much is known about the patient being treated for Ebola at Emory University other than he's an American doctor who worked for the World Health Organization is being treated at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta after he became infected with Ebola in Sierra Leone.

His name has not been released.

London's Evening Standard newspaper said Pooley and the doctor he is hoping to help were reported to be close friends after working together at the Ebola treatment center in Kenema, Sierra Leone.

There have been no reports if any anti Ebola drugs were being administered, but ZMapp is not available till later this year.

The World Health Org is paying for Mr. Pooley's flight to Atlanta.


~
eta:

The aid worker, who is the fourth American to contract Ebola, arrived at the hospital eight days ago on a specially equipped plane from Sierra Leone.


After he was admitted, infectious diseases specialist Dr Aneesh Mehta, one of the five doctors working in the special isolation unit at Emory University Hospital, said the team were looking at all treatment options for the patient.

“We believe the supportive care – allowing the body to heal itself and supporting it through that process – is the mainstay of therapy, as is true for any infectious disease,” he said. “If we have therapeutic options, we’ll evaluate those.”

~ ~

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Old 09-19-2014, 03:00 PM   #68
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Quote:
Frances' health ministry on Friday lifted restrictions on the import and use of three treatments for Ebola that are still at the experimental stage - Favipiravir from Japan, ZMapp from the US and TKM-100-802 from Canada.
the nurse tested positive for Ebola on Monday but did not arrive in Paris until Friday, The report below says her treatment with the experimental Ebola drugs only began after she arrived in Paris on Friday.

Médecins Sans Frontières has said the process of transporting the nurse to France was too slow and asked European authorities to provide an ambulance plane specially equipped for Ebola patients to airlift health-care staff to their home countries if needed.

~ ~ ~


http://www.english.rfi.fr/africa/201...paris-hospital

A French nurse who has contracted Ebola was receiving “experimental treatments”

in a French military hospital on Friday after Health Minister Marisol Touraine took the exceptional step of authorising their use.

The nurse, who has not been named, was flown to a French military airport overnight from Liberia, where she had contracted the virus while was working with the Doctors Without Borders (MSF) NGO.

Touraine, who visited the Bégin hospital at Saint Mandé just outside Paris on Friday morning as a sign of “solidarity” with staff caring for the patient, said that the drugs were administered “as soon as she arrived”.

"She was immediately transferred to the hospital in conditions of absolute security and immediately taken into care," the minister said, adding that she is in a “confinement chamber” and being treated by special staff.

The health ministry on Friday lifted restrictions on the import and use of three treatments for Ebola that are still at the experimental stage - Favipiravir from Japan, ZMapp from the US and TKM-100-802 from Canada.

The case is the first recorded among French nationals in the west African countries affected by the virus.

She had been doing voluntary work for “several years” and her morale is good, her grandmother told RTL radio.

The risk of death for an Ebola patient is 20 per cent in a European hospital, compared to 50 per cent in Africa, virologist Bruno Lina told Friday’s Metronews freesheet.

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Old 09-19-2014, 04:26 PM   #69
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Here`s an interesting change in facemask use.

http://theextinctionprotocol.wordpre...s-in-question/


– Healthcare workers play a very important role in the successful containment of outbreaks of infectious diseases like Ebola. The correct type and level of personal protective equipment (PPE) ensures that healthcare workers remain healthy throughout an outbreak—and with the current rapidly expanding Ebola outbreak in West Africa, it’s imperative to favor more conservative measures. The precautionary principle—that any action designed to reduce risk should not await scientific certainty—compels the use of respiratory protection for a pathogen like Ebola virus that has: •No proven pre- or post-exposure treatment modalities. •A high case-fatality rate. •Unclear modes of transmission. We believe there is scientific and epidemiologic evidence that Ebola virus has the potential to be transmitted via infectious aerosol particles both near and at a distance from infected patients, which means that healthcare workers should be wearing respirators, not facemasks.
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Old 09-19-2014, 04:33 PM   #70
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Cactus Az, that's a result of the latest CITRAP recommendations.

I remember reading how shoppers in markets were told maintain 7' distance between each other during the Spanish Influenza pandemic. It appears that's the rule with Ebola as well.

While Ebola is not airborne, the difference between airborne and aerosolized seems technical... particles expelled by a patient can travel 6 feet or even more under the right conditions, and stay alive for hours once they land on a surface.
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Old 09-27-2014, 02:42 PM   #71
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Default Seemingly successful Ebola treatment with HIV drug

http://edition.cnn.com/2014/09/27/he...rug/index.html

Excerpts...

A doctor in rural Liberia inundated with Ebola patients says he's had good results with a treatment he tried out of sheer desperation: an HIV drug.
Dr. Gobee Logan has given the drug, lamivudine, to 15 Ebola patients, and all but two survived. That's a 7% mortality rate......

Kundu and the other 12 patients who took the lamivudine and survived, received the drug in the first five days or so of their illness. The two patients who died received it between days five and eight.

"I'm sure that when [patients] present early, this medicine can help," Logan said. "I've proven it right in my center."......

Logan said he got the idea to try lamivudine when he read in scientific journals that HIV and Ebola replicate inside the body in much the same way.

"Ebola is a brainchild of HIV," he said. "It's a destructive strain of HIV."
At first he tried an HIV drug called acyclovir, but it didn't seem to be effective. Then he tried lamivudine on a healthcare worker who'd become ill, and within a day or two he showed signs of improvement and survived.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases says that theoretically, Logan's approach has some merit. Lamivudine is a nucleocide analog, and other drugs in this class are being studied to treat Ebola.

Fauci asked CNN to give Logan his email address, saying perhaps his lab could do some follow up work.

Logan says he plans to email Fauci this weekend.
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Old 09-27-2014, 02:48 PM   #72
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Now that is interesting.
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Old 09-27-2014, 02:56 PM   #73
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I was just reading about the lamivudine. Thanks for posting that Key.

I agree with dharma. It is interesting.

Or, in another voice ... "^ Fascinating."
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Old 09-27-2014, 02:58 PM   #74
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They need to repeat this one urgently on a larger scale. It's possible these patients were going to live anyway - we don't know. But boy, that sounds promising.
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Old 09-27-2014, 03:21 PM   #75
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Ditto
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