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Old 09-17-2015, 03:04 PM   #1
Potemkin
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Default School computers do not improve students’ results

The report is here: http://www.oecd.org/education/studen...4239555-en.htm


School computers do not improve students’ results, says OECD report

Computers do not noticeably improve school pupils' academic results and can even hamper performance, an OECD report said Tuesday that looked at the impact of technology in classrooms across the globe.

While almost three quarters of pupils in the countries surveyed used computers at schools, the report by the the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development found technology had made no noticeable improvement in results.

Conversely, in high-achieving schools in parts of Asia, where smartphones and computers have become an integral part of people's everyday lives, technology was far less prevalent in the classrooms.

In South Korea, students used computers for an average of nine minutes at school and in Hong Kong, only 11 minutes – just a fraction of the 58 minutes spent in Australia, 42 in Greece and 39 in Sweden.

"Where computers are used in the classroom, their impact on student performance is mixed at best," OECD's education director Andreas Schleicher said in a foreword to the report, the think-tank's first on the topic.

"Students who use computers very frequently at school do a lot worse in most learning outcomes, even after accounting for social background and student demographics."

The report measured the impact of technology use at school on international test results, such as the OECD's Pisa tests taken in dozens of countries around the world and other exams measuring digital skills.

More here: http://www.france24.com/en/20150915-...hamper-results
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Old 09-17-2015, 03:50 PM   #2
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Giving a kid a computer will no more make them do better in school than if you only gave them a pencil.

You have to teach them how to use it first then give them some oversight to see that they are. All tools have to be explained first before they really do anyone much good. Some of the early attempts I have seen in my kids schools they spent big bucks on the hardware and software without ever really considering they also needed to spend money on the wetware, i.e. training both the teachers and the students to get the most out of what was being given to them.
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Old 09-17-2015, 05:08 PM   #3
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Training always gets dropped first when $$ is short.

"I know.Someone can read the manual and then do a Train the Trainer!"
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Old 09-18-2015, 09:41 AM   #4
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Riffing on this for a moment as I see it the problem can be solved with or without technology. However, either or both solutions require involvement by the teacher and the parents. Especially the parents.

In the past our kids would come home with bound planners. Every day the teacher was supposed to write in it whatever it was they wanted us parents to know. The parents in turn were supposed to read, then sign, the planners so that communication could be achieved.

From my end as a parent the system worked very well when the teacher actually put something in the planner for us to see. If they did not they were worse than worthless. I have no doubt from the teacher's end they could say the same for the parents who never bothered to read their child's planners and never attempted to communicate. It fairly quickly becomes apparent who is who in this regard and it's not always the immigrants who do not perform. In fact last year in my youngest daughter's grade the highest GPA in the entire grade belonged to a first generation Mexican girl. She is sharp! Involved parents working with their child's teachers will see to it that the kid is learning even if all they have is chalk and a slate board.

It's the same problem with computers and all such technology. When the teacher is properly trained on how to use it so that they can properly teach the kids and the parents can access the part of the technology they need to be able to get to and have the interest and willingness to do so it works great. Sometimes there are problems on the technology end, sometimes on the people end.

I am as I write this post corresponding with my wife concerning my oldest daughter's grades. She's now a junior in high school, very bright, taking a full boat of tough courses, but is not always very motivated and is prone to goofing off when she thinks we're not paying attention. Pretty much the way that I was when I was in high school. The difference is that 30+ years ago the publicly accessible Internet did not exist, the only computer in school was a very limited access mainframe, and my parents were not particularly motivated to pay attention to what I was and was not doing in school. Thus it was easy for me to goof off (and blow up my GPA).

Today with email, texting, and programs such as Skyward we can check day by day (which we do not) both of my kid's grades and get a handle on what they are or are not doing. My parents could have approximated that in my day with phone calls, but they weren't motivated to do so and it would have been more difficult anyway. Still, it could have been done. Today it is much easier if their teachers are inputting the necessary information into the system for us to see it. Many do in a timely manner which is how we have just discovered that she's missing a bunch of assignments in her English class that we know she did, but for whatever reason that only makes sense to teenagers hasn't turned in yet (why do kids do this?!)

Other teachers such as one of her AP instructors in her freshman and sophmore years were terrible at updating the system so that by the time we finally did discover there was a problem it was too late to do anything about and she just had to suck up the GPA hit.

Computers, Internet, email, texting, Skyward, the entire lot. Works great when both parties know how to use them and are willing to do so.

Pencil, paper, old fashioned telephones. Works great when both parties are willing to use them and not at all when they do not.

This is why in some circumstances school computers do not actually improve grades, test scores, etc. for some students, but can do wonders for others. Interest, involvement, and training are where it's at.

Yet another long, rambling post comes to an end.
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Old 09-18-2015, 10:20 AM   #5
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The purpose of school is to learn. To do that you just need a good teacher and a student with a thirst to learn.

Unless the class is specifically about computers, 95% of the time, computers are a gimmick and I can easily see it hampering things.
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Old 09-18-2015, 10:56 AM   #6
Mama Alanna
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Potemkin View Post
Training always gets dropped first when $$ is short.

"I know.Someone can read the manual and then do a Train the Trainer!"
That's exactly what happened with the "New Math" debacle. California leaped on it with cries of delight, just as they do with every other bit of woo-woo to come down the pike. I went back to school in 5th grade, and IIRC, the teacher said, "We found out that we've been teaching you math all wrong. Now were going to teach you the right way." The kids didn't understand it, the parents didn't understand it, and my suspicion that the TEACHERS didn't understand it was confirmed a few years ago by a friend who is a mathematician.

And all that I understood was that if I did math the "wrong way" (I.e. in a way that made sense) I was marked wrong even if I got the right answer. To this day I don't getr algebra and assiduously avoided physics, calculus, trig, etc.
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