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Old 01-13-2017, 04:38 PM   #1
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Default Health Benefits of a Vegan Diet

I get it, I get it. I have eaten more than my share of bacon and burgers, but now I'm paying for it with health problems. I've embraced a 95% vegan diet for health rather than ethical reasons. It was either that or pills and surgery. I chose vegetables. I thought I would you use thread to post some supporting articles/videos of the health benefits of a mostly vegan diet. I know that a few of you are flirting with the idea.

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Old 01-13-2017, 05:20 PM   #2
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If one follows the food group percentages in western food guides, wouldn't one be eating mostly vegan?
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Old 01-13-2017, 06:28 PM   #3
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Below is the current USDA recommended dietary guide. It's recommended guidelines are a far cry from what most Americans eat.



The inclusion of dairy means that it's not vegan, but it could easily be vegetarian. My beef with the USDA info is that they don't discuss the concept of complete proteins. I guess they think it's too complicated for the general public. But it's a pretty important concept if you are a vegan or vegetarian, or if you just want to cut down on animal sources of protein. If you want to get really confused, check out the Bean and Pea section.

It's interesting that there's no mention of fats on the Choose My Plate main pages. You really have to search for information about them. I think the lack of information is misleading and confusing. For some people it could translate to "Potatoes are a vegetable therefore potato chips are good."

Nor is there information about simple sugars. Again, it's misleading. "I'm having 1 cup of cereal with 1/2 cup of milk, and 1 tablespoon of sugar." Yeah, that's a good diet.

From: Choose My Plate (USDA)

Quote:
What foods are in the Protein Foods Group?

All foods made from meat, poultry, seafood, beans and peas, eggs, processed soy products, nuts, and seeds are considered part of the Protein Foods Group. Beans and peas are also part of the Vegetable Group. For more information on beans and peas, see Beans and Peas Are Unique Foods.

Select a variety of protein foods to improve nutrient intake and health benefits, including at least 8 ounces of cooked seafood per week. Young children need less, depending on their age and calorie needs. The advice to consume seafood does not apply to vegetarians. Vegetarian options in the Protein Foods Group include beans and peas, processed soy products, and nuts and seeds. Meat and poultry choices should be lean or low-fat.

How much food from the Protein Foods Group is needed daily?

Women
19-30 years old 5 ½ ounce equivalents
31-50 years old 5 ounce equivalents
51+ years old 5 ounce equivalents


Men
19-30 years old 6 ½ ounce equivalents
31-50 years old 6 ounce equivalents
51+ years old 5 ½ ounce equivalents

What counts as an ounce-equivalent in the Protein Foods Group?

In general, 1 ounce of meat, poultry or fish, ¼ cup cooked beans, 1 egg, 1 tablespoon of peanut butter, or ½ ounce of nuts or seeds can be considered as 1 ounce-equivalent from the Protein Foods Group.

Quote:
What foods are in the Grains Group? (slight editing by me)

Any food made from wheat, rice, oats, cornmeal, barley or another cereal grain is a grain product. Bread, pasta, oatmeal, breakfast cereals, tortillas, and grits are examples of grain products.

Grains are divided into 2 subgroups, Whole Grains and Refined Grains. Whole grains contain the entire grain kernel ― the bran, germ, and endosperm. Examples of whole grains include whole-wheat flour, bulgur (cracked wheat), oatmeal, whole cornmeal, and brown rice. Refined grains have been milled, a process that removes the bran and germ. This is done to give grains a finer texture and improve their shelf life, but it also removes dietary fiber, iron, and many B vitamins. Some examples of refined grain products are white flour, de-germed cornmeal, white bread, and white rice.

Most refined grains are enriched. This means certain B vitamins (thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, folic acid) and iron are added back after processing. Fiber is not added back to enriched grains. Check the ingredient list on refined grain products to make sure that the word "enriched" is included in the grain name. Some food products are made from mixtures of whole grains and refined grains.

How many grain foods are needed daily?

Most Americans consume enough grains, but few are whole grains. At least half of all the grains eaten should be whole grains.

Women
19-30 years old 6 ounce equivalents of which half should be whole grains
31-50 years old 6 ounce equivalents same
51+ years old 5 ounce equivalents same


Men
19-30 years old 8 ounce equivalents of which half should be whole grains
31-50 years old 7 ounce equivalents same
51+ years old 6 ounce equivalents same

What counts as an ounce-equivalent of grains?

In general, 1 slice of bread, 1 cup of ready-to-eat cereal, or ½ cup of cooked rice, cooked pasta, or cooked cereal can be considered as 1 ounce-equivalent from the Grains Group.
Quote:
What foods are included in the Dairy Group?
All fluid milk products and many foods made from milk are considered part of this food group. Most Dairy Group choices should be fat-free or low-fat. Foods made from milk that retain their calcium content are part of the group. Foods made from milk that have little to no calcium, such as cream cheese, cream, and butter, are not. Calcium-fortified soymilk (soy beverage) is also part of the Dairy Group.

How much food from the Dairy Group is needed daily?

Adult men and women, all ages 3 cups

What counts as a cup in the Dairy Group?

In general, 1 cup of milk, yogurt, or soymilk (soy beverage), 1 ½ ounces of natural cheese, or 2 ounces of processed cheese can be considered as 1 cup from the Dairy Group.

Choose fat-free or low-fat milk, yogurt, and cheese. If you choose milk or yogurt that is not fat-free, or cheese that is not low-fat, the fat in the product counts against your limit for calories from saturated fats.

If sweetened milk products are chosen (flavored milk, yogurt, drinkable yogurt, desserts), the added sugars also count against your limit for calories from added sugar.
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Old 01-13-2017, 06:52 PM   #4
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No, according to the US Govt, the largest percentage of calories, at least for my sex/age/weight should come from meat, dairy and fat. I used this calculator:
https://www.choosemyplate.gov/MyPlat...hecklist-input

I have to go to work now, but studies have shown that cultures that are 95-100% whole food, plant-based eaters have almost no heart disease and the accompanying conditions (high blood pressure, cholesterol, strokes, etc). I'll post them tomorrow when I have some time off.
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Old 01-13-2017, 09:43 PM   #5
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Avoiding “bad” foods is not enough

To protect against heart attack and stroke, is it enough to avoid sweets, white flour, and fried foods? Or do we need to place more focus on eating more vegetables, fruits, beans, nuts and seeds? A large international study of nearly 16,000 people with coronary heart disease from 39 different countries suggests the latter.

The study scored participants on how closely their reported diets aligned with either “Mediterranean” or “Western” diet patterns. For the Mediterranean score, participants received 0-4 points based on their daily servings of whole grains, vegetables, legumes, and fruits; weekly consumption of fish and moderate alcohol consumption added points too. The Western diet score increased with more frequent consumption of refined grains, sweets and desserts, sugary drinks, and deep fried foods.

After a follow-up period of 3.7 years, major cardiovascular events (non-fatal heart attack, non-fatal stroke, or death from a cardiovascular cause) were assessed. About 18 percent of participants had a Mediterranean diet score of 15 or higher, and this group had the lowest risk of major cardiovascular events. Also, starting at a Mediterranean diet score of 12, there were dose-dependent risk reductions: for each 1 point increase in Mediterranean diet score, the risk of all major cardiovascular events was 5 percent lower, for heart attack 4 percent lower, and for stroke 9 percent lower.

There was no association between the Western diet score and cardiovascular events, which means that eating more or less unhealthy food did not make much difference either way.1 What made the real difference was when people ate more vegetables, beans, nuts and seeds. The consumption of these beneficial foods had a more powerful effect than just avoiding unhealthy food. The authors propose that dietary guidelines for prevention should focus on greater consumption of health-promoting foods. Switching from white bread to whole wheat bread, giving up sugary drinks, and avoiding fried foods is a good start, but it’s not enough. It’s a modest change that will bring only modest results. When you increase high-nutrient, cardioprotective foods, you’ll decrease the low-nutrient foods automatically, and over time lose your desire for them. You may also save your life.

“Western” foods harm the cardiovascular system
The foods that contributed to the Western diet score have known hazardous effects on the cardiovascular system. Refined grains, sweets, desserts, and sugary drinks are high-glycemic foods; a high-glycemic diet causes dangerously high glucose and insulin levels, dramatically increasing the risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease.2-5 These foods also lead to exposure to advanced glycation end products, which can cause damage to the vascular system.6 Foods fried in oil elevate circulating fats after a meal, drive inflammation, and impair endothelial function, promoting the development of atherosclerosis.7-10

High-nutrient plant foods benefit the cardiovascular system
The whole plant foods contributing to the Mediterranean diet score have been linked to lower cardiovascular risk in this and other large international studies. The INTERHEART study, for example, identified low vegetable and fruit intake as one of 9 mostly modifiable risk factors responsible for 90 percent of heart attacks across 52 countries.11 In the Global Burden of Disease Study, dietary risk factors (including low intake of vegetables, fruits, and nuts/seeds) were attributable for 11.3 million deaths worldwide in 2013.12So remember, a Mediterranean diet is a step in the right direction, but it is not the same as a Nutritarian diet. A Mediterranean diet may reduce risk of heart disease somewhat, but it still permits plenty of needless heart attacks, while a Nutritarian diet is designed to completely wipe out cardiovascular risk.

Unquestionably, green vegetables, berries, beans, nuts and seeds help to lower cholesterol and blood pressure, prevent weight gain, and mitigate the oxidative stress and inflammation that drive atherosclerosis.13-21 In my book The End of Heart Disease, I explain in detail how protective foods work to powerfully protect the heart and blood vessels. The efficacy of a Nutritarian diet-style designed to offer maximal protection provides radical benefits, as demonstrated in a 2015 study in the American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine. It showed dramatic reductions in weight, cholesterol, and blood pressure, as well as case studies with advanced heart disease demontrating atherosclerosis reversal and resolution of heart disease.22 Everyone needs to know that drugs cannot offer the degree of protection that a Nutritarian diet can and that you do not have to have a heart attack.
https://www.drfuhrman.com/learn/libr...-is-not-enough
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Old 01-13-2017, 09:53 PM   #6
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http://nutritionfacts.org/2017/01/05...nt-based-diet/

Quote:
The Mediterranean Diet vs. a Completely Plant-Based Diet
Written by: Michael Greger M.D. FACLM on January 5th, 2017
The Mediterranean Diet vs. a Completely Plant-Based Diet
Recent studies have shown that higher Mediterranean diet adherence scores are associated with a significant reduction of the risk of death, heart disease, cancer, and brain disease. The problem with such population studies is that people who eat healthier may also live healthier, and so how do we know it’s their diet? I explore this question in The Mediterranean Diet or a Whole Food Plant-Based Diet?.

As the American Heart Association position states, “Before advising people to follow a Mediterranean diet, we need more studies to find out whether the diet itself or other lifestyle factors account for the lower deaths from heart disease.” How do you do that? There are ways you can control for obvious things like smoking and exercise—which many of the studies did—but ideally you’d do an interventional trial, the gold standard of nutritional science. You change people’s diets while trying to keep everything else the same and see what happens.

We got that kind of trial 20 years ago with the famous Lyon Diet Heart Study where about 600 folks who had just had their first heart attack were randomized into two groups. The control group received no dietary advice, apart from whatever their doctors were telling them, while the experimental group was told to eat more of a Mediterranean-type diet, supplemented with a canola-oil based spread to give them the plant-based omega-3’s they’d normally be getting from seeds and walnuts if they actually lived on a Greek isle in the 1950’s.

The Mediterranean diet group did end up taking some of the dietary advice to heart. They ate more bread, more fruit, less deli meat, less meat in general, and less butter and cream; other than that, no significant changes in diet were reported in terms of wine, olive oil, or fish consumption. So, they ate less saturated fat and cholesterol, more plant-based omega 3’s, but didn’t undergo huge dietary changes. Even so, at the end of about four years, 44 individuals from the control group had a second heart attack, either fatal or nonfatal, but only 14 suffered another attack in the group that changed their diet. So, they went from having a 4% chance of having a heart attack every year down to 1%.

A cynic might say that while there was less death and disease, the Mediterranean diet continued to feed their heart disease, so much so that 14 of them suffered new heart attacks while on the diet. Yes, their disease progressed, but a lot less than the regular diet group (about four times less). But what if there was a diet that could stop or even reverse heart disease?

Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn and colleagues at the Cleveland Clinic recently published a case series of 198 consecutive patients with cardiovascular disease counseled to switch to a diet composed entirely of whole plant foods. Of the 198, 177 stuck to the diet, whereas the other 21 fell off the wagon, setting up kind of a natural experiment. What happened to the 21? This was such a sick group of patients that more than half suffered from either a fatal heart attack or needed angioplasty or a heart transplant. In that same time period of about four years, of the 177 that stuck to the plant-based diet, only one had a major event as a result of worsening disease. As Dean Ornish noted in his response to the latest trial, “a Mediterranean diet is better than what most people are consuming”…but even better may be a diet based on whole plant foods.

Dr. Esselstyn’s was not a randomized trial; so, it can’t be directly compared to the Lyon study, and it included very determined patients. Not everyone is willing to dramatically change their diets, even if it may literally be a matter of life or death. In which case, rather than doing nothing, eating a more Mediterranean-type diet may cut risk for heart attack survivors by about two-thirds. Cutting 99% of risk would be better if Esselstyn’s results were replicated in a controlled trial, but even a 70% drop in risk could save tens of thousands of lives every year.
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Old 01-13-2017, 10:09 PM   #7
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And finally, a link to a page of links.
http://www.forksoverknives.com/tag/heart-disease/
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Old 01-13-2017, 10:10 PM   #8
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I know that I couldn't go vegan but I'm okay with a semi-vegetarian diet. I've been working on getting DH to understand the concept of meat being treated like a condiment instead of a main ingredient. He's okay with that idea for some things like a stir-fried beef & broccoli. But, don't stand between him and a meatloaf.

My goal is to get us to the point where we eat a non-meat main meal 4 times a week, a meat as condiment meal twice a week, and a carnivore meal once a week.

For us, lasting change comes in a series of baby steps.
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Old 01-14-2017, 08:31 AM   #9
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I have gone vegetarian since the beginning of the year for health reasons. I fear not getting enough quality protein without including some eggs and very low fat milk products. I have serious issues with fats and oils, and avoiding them helps my digestion. I do not exclude them though.

I think our biggest problem is with portion control. Regardless of with, or without meat, we should all eat off of small dessert plates, with a good sized salad bowl of low calorie veggies (not potatoes). I am not talking about a Big Mac, or PB&J fitting on that dessert plate either. We tend to eat like we did as greedy teens, but our bodies just can't handle that amount of food without getting fat...except rryan.
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Old 01-14-2017, 09:52 AM   #10
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I am not "flirting" with being Vegan - I am full on sexual assaulted.

Just saying.... and the coffee SUCKS with Vegan creamer! (Think vanilla bean curd piss)

It is too early for me to be nice when I am a suffering grump.
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Old 01-14-2017, 10:35 AM   #11
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One of the helpers on the farm is vegan. On the days he's here lunch is vegan and we've had some wonderful meals.

As for me, I love good cheese, cream, ice cream, butter, good fish, local meat and game when available, meat broths and home rendered fats. They are not a huge percentage of my diet and my emphasis is more on quality than quantity.

My opinion of the USDA chart is that it is still biased toward Agri-business not necessary good nutrition though it is better than the old pyramid chart.

I'm not a big fan of the emphasis on soy. There is quite a debate about unfermented soy and its effect.

Not the best link but food for thought:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/dr-mer...b_1822466.html

and from Harvard:

https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutriti...alk-about-soy/

I agree with eliminating highly processed flours and sugars. However, I make one big exception, I love good pasta. I just don't eat a lot of it
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Old 01-14-2017, 01:03 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by andy View Post
I am not "flirting" with being Vegan - I am full on sexual assaulted.

Just saying.... and the coffee SUCKS with Vegan creamer! (Think vanilla bean curd piss)

It is too early for me to be nice when I am a suffering grump.
Go with a deacidified coffee and you will likely not need coffee.
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Old 01-14-2017, 04:07 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Mousehound View Post
I have gone vegetarian since the beginning of the year for health reasons. I fear not getting enough quality protein without including some eggs and very low fat milk products. I have serious issues with fats and oils, and avoiding them helps my digestion. I do not exclude them though.

I think our biggest problem is with portion control. Regardless of with, or without meat, we should all eat off of small dessert plates, with a good sized salad bowl of low calorie veggies (not potatoes). I am not talking about a Big Mac, or PB&J fitting on that dessert plate either. We tend to eat like we did as greedy teens, but our bodies just can't handle that amount of food without getting fat...except rryan.
I wouldn't worry about protein. It's amazing how much protein is in foods that we normally wouldn't suspect of containing protein. For example, 1/2 cup of cooked spinach contains 3 grams of protein and I seldom only eat 1/2 cup of it! It is suggested that women our age need around 50 grams per day. When I track my foods, I am always in the ballpark for protein, even on my 100% vegan days. Here are a couple of charts:
http://www.todaysdietitian.com/pdf/w...entofFoods.pdf

https://www.healthaliciousness.com/a...in-protein.php

As for portion control, I completely agree with you. The only foods I don't portion control, other than making the portions as huge as I can possibly eat, are greens: lettuce, kale, cabbages, etc. In fact, with dh who is a committed omnivore, I serve our salads first then our main course. The base of each of our salads is a minimum of 6 cups of lettuce/shredded cabbage - which is 6 grams of protein just in the lettuce/ Then, I top them with whatever we're in the mood for. DH, who doesn't need to lose weight, almost always gets half an avocado on his and I make sure and include some seeds or avocado on mine as well since the fat helps with the nutrient absorption of the greens. Then, I bring out our main course which for me, is usually just a small bowl of soup or chili since I'm stuffed with lettuce! DH gets a small piece of animal protein (usually 3-4 oz) a starch, and a large portion of steamed veggie. I cook SOS - free (Salt, Oil, Sugar) but DH adds salt to his meal at the table. Dessert is always fruit of some sort - grapes, melon, and right now, oranges since my trees went nuts this year! We also share a nonfat, decaff mocha (my cheat) if we watch a movie or television at night. This is when DH will also break into his cookie stash.

As for the eggs and dairy, if you don't have cholesterol issues, I would keep them in your diet in small amounts. It broke my heart to have to give up eating eggs from my friend's chicken flock but my cholesterol was dangerously high and now it's almost, not quite, but almost at normal levels. Dr. Fuhrman (The End of Dieting, The End of Heart Disease, etc) talks about how this eating plan is in effect, nutritional surgery. The last few weeks, when I've been tempted to reach for my MIL's ice cream or DH's cookies/chips, I remember that phrase "nutritional surgery." And then I also remember the memorial service for one of my musician friends, six years older than me, who died of a massive heart attack two days before Christmas. Then, I think about my Dad who just had his leg amputated from complications of diabetes and now we've found out that it may never heal well enough to support a prosthetic limb.

This is an interesting video, and it's short, unlike the first video I posted!

https://www.forksoverknives.com/prev...ure-with-diet/

---------- Post added at 12:07 PM ---------- Previous post was at 12:03 PM ----------

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Originally Posted by andy View Post
I am not "flirting" with being Vegan - I am full on sexual assaulted.

Just saying.... and the coffee SUCKS with Vegan creamer! (Think vanilla bean curd piss)

It is too early for me to be nice when I am a suffering grump.
Try full-fat soy milk (it comes in flavors but it's NOT healthful) and then graduate to cashew milk and then drinking your coffee black. Or, simply give up coffee.
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Old 01-14-2017, 08:41 PM   #14
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Exclamation

I went to - or was dragged to a furniture store grand opening. There was a full catered BBQ. I had to eat spinach leaves!!!!!!

A few minutes ago, I went to a local grocery for jelly. I started going manic. I took out my "List if Phone Numbers" of people to call (if you don't get this - good for you). I was able to reach my Daughter. She quietly yelled at me to run to the cookie isle, grab a bag of Oreos, rip the quick flap, and gorge. WOW - WHAT A RUSH!!!!! (and Vegan toooooo!!)



Now I am not hungry - I'm SICK
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Old 01-25-2017, 06:32 PM   #15
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http://www.riseofthevegan.com/blog/g...er-been-higher

Quote:
Google Searches for 'VEGAN' Have Never Been Higher
More people Googled 'vegan' last week than ever before
January 4, 2017

Google Trends, which records how many searches are made for particular terms is showing that searches for 'vegan' have never been higher.



The peak coincided with the end of the year, a time when traditionally people make New Year's resolutions to improve parts of their life - and we know that more people than ever before chose to switch to a vegan lifestyle.

The Trends measures searches from all over the world but the top 10 countries searching for 'vegan' were:

1. Australia
2. Canada
3. United States
4. New Zealand
5. Germany
6. Austria
7. United Kingdom
8. Sweden
9. Ireland
10. Switzerland



Google Trends is a useful indicator for gauging what is capturing the general public's attention.

The Veganuary campaign encourages the public to go vegan every January with the hope that it will be a permanent switch after people see how easy the lifestyle is and how much better it makes them feel. This year already more than twice the amount of people signed up to go vegan for the entire month of January compared to last year.

You can see the huge difference in Veganuary sign-ups on the graph below. The blue line is 2014/2015, the orange line is 2015/2016 and the grey line is sign ups this year (2016/2017).

Veganuary sign-ups at record high

Last year we saw a huge increase in the number of people rejecting meat and dairy and adopting fully plant-based diets. In fact, the numbers of those following vegan diets has grown by a remarkable 261% in the UK and vegan food sales have increased 1,500%.

There are many reasons fuelling the rise in veganism, including increasing consumer-awareness of the barbaric practices of factory farming, and ease of access to more delicious vegan foods as companies expand their vegan ranges. It may also be because of growing awareness of the looming threat from antibiotic resistance caused by the meat industry, or the unsustainable environmental issues surrounding meat/diary production which were highlighted earlier this year in the report from leading investors to the 16 largest food companies.

Whatever the reason, there's no better time to go vegan. People are usually amazed at how much better they feel without ingesting animal products and they discover so many new delicious foods they won't even want to go back to meat/dairy again.
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Old 02-20-2017, 07:37 PM   #16
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More on the Vegan Protein Myth here:


Quote:
Where Do You Get Your Protein?

Submitted on May 30, 2010 - 12:22pm
Author: Alan Goldhamer, D.C.
The role and need for protein is a much misunderstood topic in our society. In this article you will learn how to better understand the role of protein in your diet.

First, let me provide you with a rather technical definition of a protein. A protein is any one of a group of complex organic, nitrogenous compounds, which form the principal constituents of the cell protoplasm. In other words, proteins make up the "guts" of the cells that are the building blocks of our body.

Many of the structural and functional components of our cells are made up of various proteins.

In man, proteins function in many capacities. They act as organic catalysts in the form of enzymes, as messengers such as peptide hormones, as antibodies that protect us from the effect of microorganisms, and as carrier agents in our blood to transport oxygen and other gases, as well as forming structural components of the cell.

The exact human needs for dietary protein are not known. According to The New England Journal of Medicine: "As for human protein requirements, the pendulum is still swinging because our knowledge of precise human requirements and the inter-relationships among them is far more fragmentary and tentative than generally realized."

Amino Acids

All proteins are composed of amino acids. An amino acid is any one of a class of organic compounds containing a certain amino and carboxyl group. The amino acids are the chief building blocks of proteins; that is, proteins are made by putting various amino acids together into specific combinations.

Although there are dozens of naturally occurring amino acids, the proteins in our body are derived from just twenty. Of these twenty amino acids, our body is able to adequately synthesize twelve internally. The other eight amino acids must be derived externally; that is, we must get them in our diet. These eight amino acids that we must get in our diet are called essential amino acids.

Although our body can recycle the essential amino acids, it cannot produce them. Therefore, the diet must provide a supply of them so that the body has enough raw materials in the form of essential amino acids to replace the normal, everyday losses.

These obligatory losses involve the use of amino acids in the production of products that are not recycled, such as purine bases, creatine, and epinephrine. These are degraded to uric acid, creatinine, and epinephrine - and excreted.

Without an outside source of amino acids, the body's reserves of protein would become depleted, and this starvation process would eventually lead to death.

We get these essential amino acids by eating foods that contain them. But eating is not the only consideration. The proteins of plants and animals are useless to us unless our digestive system is able to break them down into their constituent amino acids and absorb them.

Our digestive systems are not designed to absorb the very large protein molecules, only the smaller amino acids and peptides. Once absorbed, these amino acids become the raw materials from which our body can synthesize the many proteins that serve so many vital functions.

Protein Metabolism

Let's look at the actual metabolism of protein. The digestion of dietary protein begins in the stomach with exposure to the enzyme pepsin, which is secreted in the digestive juices and is activated by hydrochloric acid. Contrary to popular opinion, hydrochloric acid does not digest protein, it merely creates an appropriate media in which pepsin can work.

This secretion of hydrochloric acid is followed by the production of other protein digestion factors or proteolytic enzymes by the pancreas and the mucosal cells of the small intestine.

Once the large dietary protein molecules are broken down to their constituent amino acid components, absorption can take place through the mucosal cells of the small intestine.

Amino acids from dietary digestion are not alone, because the ingestion of food-even non-nitrogenous food-stimulates the digestive tract to secrete endogenous protein, derived from the sloughing of intestinal cells and used up digestive enzymes. These recycled proteins are a rich source of essential amino acids.

Studies by Nasset show that regardless of the amino acid mix of the meal, the intestinal tract maintains a remarkably similar ratio of essential amino acids.

This mixing of endogenous and dietary protein is a key concept. Until this was discovered, it was generally believed that in order to absorb and utilize the essential amino acids in the diet, the diet must contain all the amino acids in certain proportions and presented all at the same time.

This mistaken belief dates back to 1914 when Osborn and Mendel studied the protein requirements of laboratory rats. They found that rats grew faster on animal sources of protein than on vegetable sources. This was followed up by studies by Elman in 1939 using purified and isolated amino acids in rats.

We have learned a lot since 1939. But even today many so-called nutrition experts continue to advance this ancient concept, and many of the protein combining and protein quality arguments are based on this misconception.

According to Nasset, writing in the Journal of the American Medical Association, this mixing of endogenous protein is the body's way of regulating the relative concentrations of the amino acids available for absorption.

We now know that the body is quite capable of taking incomplete proteins and making them complete by utilizing this recycling mechanism. It is now clear that more than 200 grams of endogenous protein is added to the 30 to 100 grams of daily dietary protein.

I would like to point out that the earlier research, which is still so often used to support the mistaken idea that all the essential amino acids must be present at the same time at each meal for amino acids to be absorbed, did not even deal with amino acid absorption. It falsely stated that the essential amino acids must be present at the site of protein synthesis, within the cells of the liver, kidney or muscle. Since the recycling effect of the body's amino acids was not yet understood, the assumption was made that the only source of protein was from the diet.

Not only do we get the majority of our amino acids from recycling, but in 1961 Bender showed that an animal was able to maintain slow growth with proteins completely lacking one essential amino acid.

These concepts have been confirmed by Monroe and are reported in the 1983 edition of Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease by Goodheart and Shills.

The important fact here is that the majority of amino acids absorbed from the intestinal tract are derived from recycled body protein. We are in a sense all flesh eaters, a form of self-cannibalization.

Once absorbed, this combination of endogenous and dietary protein passes by way of the portal vein to the liver. The liver monitors the absorbed amino acids and adjusts the rate of their metabolism according to bodily needs.

How Much Protein Do We Need?

We must have a source of protein to replace the amino acids that are not recycled. The question is, "How much?"

This question has been a hotbed of scientific-and not so scientific-debate since 1830 when a Dutch scientist named Mulder coined the term protein.

In 1865 Playfair in England presented studies that led him to believe that the diet of the average healthy man should contain 119 grams of protein a day.

Later a man named Voit studied Munich brewery workers and found they consumed 190 grams of protein a day. Based on his studies of these brewery workers, Voit advocated 125 grams of protein per day. It was not until 1913 that Hindhede looked up the mortality rates of Voit's brewery workers and discovered that most of these individuals died very young.

In 1947 the University of Rochester laboratories had a project to establish the essential amino acid requirements of the adult male rat. In order to keep the intake of calories and nitrogen constant, the animals were fed a synthetic diet by means of a stomach tube. Attempts to relate extrapolations made from this type of study to humans are obviously questionable.

More recent studies of protein metabolism in man have been made using nitrogen balance data as a parameter. Nitrogen balance studies measure the total amount of nitrogen in the form of dietary protein that is consumed and compares that with the total amount of nitrogen excreted in the urine, feces, integumental losses, sweat, hair as well as semen, menstrual fluid and even the breath. The idea is that if the amount of protein eaten is as much as that given off, the body must be getting enough to maintain balance.

All natural foods-from lettuce to nuts-contain varying amounts of protein.

If a varied diet sufficient in calories is consumed, it is virtually impossible to get an inadequate protein intake. Even a diet devoid of concentrated sources of protein such as animal products, nuts and legumes will meet optimum protein needs.

Most conventional nutritional thinking ignores the tremendous contribution of plant foods to our protein needs. Most conventional diets contain only token amounts of these foods, relying instead on high fat, high protein animal products and a conglomeration of refined carbohydrates.

Are We Built to Eat Meat?

Even a brief look at comparative anatomy illustrates quite clearly that man is not designed to be a carnivore. And just because our bodies have a vital need for a substance does not mean that twice or three times our need is even better. In the case of protein, the concept that more is better is dead wrong.

It is interesting to note that most of our teeth are flat for grinding grains and vegetables-and that our hands are better designed for gathering than for tearing flesh apart. Our saliva contains alpha-amylase whose sole purpose is the digestion of carbohydrates. Alpha-amylase is not found in the saliva of carnivorous animals. Carnivores have the capacity to eliminate large amounts of cholesterol, whereas our livers can excrete only limited amounts. Like herbivores, we sweat to cool our bodies rather than pant like carnivores.

Of all animals that include meat in their diet, man is the only animal that is unable to break down uric acid to allantoin. This is due to the fact that man does not possess the necessary enzyme uricase. This leads to an increased possibility of an accumulation of uric acid in the body when animal products are eaten. (Uric acid is an intermediary product of metabolism that is associated with various pathological states, including gout.)

Problems with Meat

Compared to vegetarians, meat eaters have been shown to have massively increased levels of bile acids.

Animal products are a source of parasites and contamination. Uncooked or improperly cooked meat, fish, fowl and dairy products are the source of parasites such as Trichinosis found in pork and pork-contaminated beef, bacterial infection from Salmonellosis found in milk products and other contaminated animal products. There are multitudes of chemical agents such as carcinogenic nitrates, etc. that are added to animal products to slow down their decay, improve their color and alter their taste. Most animal products undergo significant heat treatment before consumption.

The use of heat presents serious problems. For example, a one-kilogram charbroiled steak contains as much of the cancer-causing benzopyrene as from 600 cigarettes. Methyl choanthrene is another example of a carcinogenic substance derived from heated meat. The heating of any fat, including the fats in animal products, can cause peroxidation and the formation of free radicals.

Free radicals are extremely reactive molecules that are capable of damaging almost any cell of the body. Free radicals have been shown to cause alterations to collagen and elastin tissue leading to premature aging of the skin and connective tissue. They contribute to the accumulation of intra-cellular debris such as lipofuscin and creoid and are thought to be an important component in the aging process.

In addition to parasites, bacterial infestation, toxic poisons, carcinogenic agents, and free radicals, animal products all suffer from the problem of biological concentration. Animals consume large quantities of grain, grass, etc., which are to a greater or lesser extent contaminated with herbicides, pesticides, and other agents. In addition, animals are often fed antibiotics and treated with other drugs and toxic agents. These poisons concentrate in the fat of the animal and are present in highly concentrated amount in an animal's milk and flesh. This biological concentration of poisons poses significant threats to the health of humans who consume these concentrated sources of poisons.

As if this weren't enough, animal products are completely devoid of fiber and are extremely high in protein and in spite of what millions of dollars of meat and dairy industry advertising would have you believe it is excess, not inadequate protein, that is the threat to health. Excess protein intake has been strongly implicated as a causal agent in many disease processes including kidney disease, various forms of cancer, osteoporosis and a host of autoimmune and hypersensitivity disease processes.

If animal products are included in the diet in significant quantities, it is virtually impossible to design a diet that is consistent with the overwhelming bulk of evidence in the scientific literature dealing with nutrition.

It is ironic that the chief argument used to promote the use of animal products-that is, the purported need for large quantities of protein-is the greatest reason for avoiding them.

A diet of sufficient caloric intake derived from fresh fruits and vegetables with the variable addition of nuts, whole grains and legumes will provide an optimum intake of protein and other nutrients, 30-70 grams per day, depending upon the particular foods eaten.


---------- Post added at 03:37 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:37 PM ----------

http://www.healthpromoting.com/learn...t-your-protein
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Old 02-23-2017, 11:46 AM   #17
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I want to say "HI" to my Daughter who is sneaking around the stacks here somewhere.






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Old 02-23-2017, 11:58 AM   #18
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I still have not heard about eating insects, yeast, and honey.

I love peanut butter, but I read somewhere it is filled with bug parts - which are high in protein. I also think cashews have bugs, and Brussel sprouts (which is why we soak them in salt water for a while. Those worms are GROSS!!!). I think those worms come from moths - personal experience growing the little cabbages.
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Old 02-23-2017, 03:28 PM   #19
AndreaCA
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No one is truly 100% vegan. There are bugs, visible or microscopic, in just about everything we eat. In fact, the reason gorillas don't have to worry about B12 deficiency is that they are eating animal proteins (bugs, small lizards, etc ) inadvertantly as they graze. Studies have shown that consuming up to 5% of your daily calories from animal sources won't deter from the health benefits of a 100% vegan diet. I'm on a phone out of town working today. I'll post exact references when I'm back this weekend. ☺

---------- Post added at 11:28 AM ---------- Previous post was at 11:26 AM ----------

Hi Andy's daughter! Feel free to post! Most of us won't bite. ��
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