Go Back   This Blue Marble, a Global Current Events Discussion Forum > Health and Medicine > Medical News

Medical News News, information and discussions about health issues, medicine and biotechnology.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-11-2017, 08:39 PM   #1
Potemkin
Omne ignotum pro magnifico
 
Potemkin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 27,931
Blog Entries: 3
Thanks: 110
Thanked 5,659 Times in 2,809 Posts
Default Bariatric sugery for 500kg woman

India: World's heaviest woman weighing 500 kg to undergo operation in Mumbai







Published on Feb 11, 2017
Eman Ahmed Abd El Aty, the heaviest woman in the world weighing in at 500 kg (1102.3lbs), was transported to Saifee Hospital in Mumbai for a weight reduction operation on Saturday.

The 36-year-old Egyptian has not been able to step outside her house for the last 25 years.

Ahmed arrived in the early hours of Saturday after flying aboard an Airbus 300-600 freighter from Alexandria’s Borg EI Arab Airport. From there was transported in a special bed in a truck escorted by an ambulance and police, before arriving at the hospital, which she was lifted into by crane.

Ahmed was offered the treatment after Saifee's consultant bariatric surgeon Dr Lakdawala tweeted about her condition prompting an online campaign to raise funds for the operation. External Affairs Minister Sushma Swaraj replied to the tweet, saying that she would help bring Ahmed to India.

According to Lakdawala, all medical assistance will be provided for free and Ahmed will remain in post-operation care for at least for 6 months.






__________________
“The price of freedom is the willingness to do sudden battle anywhere, any time and with utter recklessness.”
― Robert A. Heinlein, The Puppet Masters
Potemkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2017, 09:00 PM   #2
CanadaSue
SuperModerator
 
CanadaSue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: In my gardens or online
Posts: 35,508
Blog Entries: 28
Thanks: 2,486
Thanked 11,047 Times in 5,057 Posts
Very high chance she'll not survive the surgery. Last I heard, the death rate was roughly 5% & the heavier the patient, the higher the risks. Post-op complications... staggering. Infection, clots, tons of others our qualified medical types could easily list.

The care plan, pre & post op would be something to see; I know I'd love to. I expect she'll need pretty complex efforts - nutrition, physio... just turning her in bed to any degree will have to be done often & carefully - her poor skin must be a mess.

I'm going to try & find some more info & hopefully something that will periodically give generic follow ups on how she's doing.

The family dynamics must be interesting. At that size, someone else is bringing you your food.
__________________
Searching for a dream to run after & catch!
CanadaSue is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to CanadaSue For This Useful Post:
Feather (02-12-2017), NowVoyager (02-11-2017)
Old 02-11-2017, 09:18 PM   #3
CanadaSue
SuperModerator
 
CanadaSue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: In my gardens or online
Posts: 35,508
Blog Entries: 28
Thanks: 2,486
Thanked 11,047 Times in 5,057 Posts
I found this article in our National Post; it dates from early December before her flight to India & I'm about to check out a BBC article - they're generally pretty good at walking the fine line between information/privacy:


***‘How is she even alive?’: Woman who reportedly weighs 1,100 pounds to fly to India for weight loss surgery

For more than two decades, Eman Ahmed Abd El Aty has not left her home in Egypt. But now the 36-year-old woman is set to travel 2,700 miles to Mumbai for potentially life-saving surgery. Abd El Aty weighs 500 kilograms, or about 1,100 pounds, according to her family.

At that weight, Abd El Aty would be the heaviest woman alive by roughly 450 pounds, and close to the heaviest woman ever to live. (At her heaviest, Michigan woman Carol Yager weighed 1,189 pounds, according to a 1993 Associated Press report.)

Muffazal Lakdawala, a bariatric surgeon at the Center for Obesity and Digestive Surgery in Mumbai, will operate on Abd El Aty. The doctor has performed the most single-incision laparoscopic surgeries, a minimally-invasive procedure that relies on video cameras threaded into the body, in the world, according to his bio on the medical center’s website. The Times of India reported that Lakdawala has operated on high-ranking Indian politicians, including two ministers in India’s cabinet.

Lakdawala told The Washington Post he has operated on patients above 660 pounds before, but Abd El Aty’s surgery will be “very high risk.”
...***

More at link:

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/wo...t-loss-surgery
__________________
Searching for a dream to run after & catch!
CanadaSue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2017, 11:01 PM   #4
Potemkin
Omne ignotum pro magnifico
 
Potemkin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 27,931
Blog Entries: 3
Thanks: 110
Thanked 5,659 Times in 2,809 Posts
She is 36 and hasn't left the house in 25 years.

So she was 11yo when this likely started.
__________________
“The price of freedom is the willingness to do sudden battle anywhere, any time and with utter recklessness.”
― Robert A. Heinlein, The Puppet Masters
Potemkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2017, 11:06 PM   #5
NowVoyager
Senior Level 6
 
NowVoyager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: East of paradise and west of tomorrow
Posts: 8,965
Thanks: 21,858
Thanked 8,522 Times in 3,451 Posts
The fact that she's so morbidly obese speaks volumes about those who have been enabling her by feeding her.

I doubt the surgery will be successful, because it's more than likely her entire body / organs are at the brinks of shutting down. And how does one gauge the amount of medications for a person that huge? I pity the anesthesiologist.

I'm sure she must feel some degree of shame to have allowed herself to get to such a state ---Getting her from her home to the hospital, she'll basically be treated like living freight. And the OR will need to be adapted to handle such a massive amount of flesh. There's a huge difference between doing surgery of any kind on a *normal* sized person, but even the tools will have to be adapted, I would assume to deal with want is likely a foot or more, of fat.

Like Sue pointed out, afterwards she'll require a massive amount of long term care and the odds of her being able to maintain that level of care outside the hospital, is questionable.
__________________
The untold want, by life and land ne’er granted,
Now, Voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.

Walt Whitman
NowVoyager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-11-2017, 11:08 PM   #6
CanadaSue
SuperModerator
 
CanadaSue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: In my gardens or online
Posts: 35,508
Blog Entries: 28
Thanks: 2,486
Thanked 11,047 Times in 5,057 Posts
The BBC article mentions she suffered from elephantiasis but the surgeon thinks it's far more likely to be lymphedema... which makes more sense. Between that & a stroke she allegedly had, she couldn't walk. But... she's had little to no medical care in ages so step one will be a proper workup to see just where she's starting from.

She's cared for by her mother & sister. Here's the BBC article from December:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/38238478
__________________
Searching for a dream to run after & catch!
CanadaSue is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2017, 12:29 AM   #7
drummagick
new age airy-fairy hippie
 
drummagick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: North Central Washington State
Posts: 6,985
Thanks: 2,913
Thanked 2,916 Times in 1,191 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by NowVoyager View Post
Getting her from her home to the hospital, she'll basically be treated like living freight.

.

That's about it. Especially at the end, lifting her from the truck with a crane.

drummagick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2017, 11:08 AM   #8
CanadaSue
SuperModerator
 
CanadaSue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: In my gardens or online
Posts: 35,508
Blog Entries: 28
Thanks: 2,486
Thanked 11,047 Times in 5,057 Posts
The more I think about this case, the more complicated it becomes.

Before anything is done save transporting her, a lot of factors would have had to be considered. First, she's used to the microbiome, (germ population), in her home. Not only is she departing a location she's not left in 25+ years, she's flying to an entirely different country with a whole new set of micronasties. Even typically benign bacteria might cause her grief.

And although she was transported on a mattress - any higher risks of blood clotting? She's already at high risk for that.

As to the surgery itself... they'll have to turn whatever room she'll be in into a temporary OR, I would think. Lifting her on/off a heavily modified OR table doesn't strike me as a valid option but unless they can essentially sterilize a room... maybe they will.

In a lot of ways, I think they're in completely novel territory here. I watch a fair bit of the TLC shows dealing with bariatric surgery & man, at 600+ lbs. it's not easy. These patients deal with a very experienced bariatric surgeon in a milieu designed for bariatric cases. I don't know what the basic setup for bariatric work is at this hospital. Yes, you can adapt spaces, fittings & furniture for bariatric cases but this is a whole other level of heavy & I've got so many questions.

What are baselines for cardiac, pulmonary & kidney functions, for starters? What about lab values? Are there safe ways to test for organ function beyond blood work?

Pre & post op nutrition. I'm going to use an Assumptive level of a calorie per pound of body weight required to maintain weight for a sedentary person - which this poor lady surely is. That's 11,000 calories per day. "Dropping" her to a 4000 calorie per day intake should result in a 2 pound a day weight loss - if it's as simple as a linear function... I admit I have no idea. Now, how do you assure she has enough of a fluid intake to flush those waste products without overloading her heart/lungs?

Okay, I'm going to step on several skinny limbs & ASSume: she survives the surgery... how on earth does healing happen without infections? The positioning of so much fat to me implies a lot of tugging, stretching & potentially, tearing. How do you medicate for the prevention of infection, for pain, for other issues that may crop up? Let's say that starts happening, along whatever timeline could/would be considered 'normal' for this lady.... & I suspect they'll literally be rewriting or writing the book on this - let me call it "hyperbaric" surgery...

The surgeon mentioned keeping her, (so far), in the Indian hospital for 6 months. 180 or so days where presumably, she could loose 300-350 or so pounds. That still leaves her - AFTER this weight loss, at north of 700 pounds. When was the last time she was able to sit up, never mind move much of anything? She's going to need a lot of physio just to get her joints used to moving, never mind getting mobile.

Assuming she gets that far, I have to wonder if any facility in Egypt can handle what will be profound, ongoing needs for a long time. Her caloric intake will drop to... 1200 calories max?; post op? Those calories are going to have to be so carefully balanced to ensure the right nutritional intake & I can't begin to understand what sort of vitamin supplementation she'll need Even passive weight loss, just lying there & with a strictly reduced intake, will be high & have to be closely monitored. Can her kidneys handle processing all the by-products of weight loss?

What about her mother & sister, who are said to have been looking after her at home? THEY, assuming she lives, are going to need a lot of help to overcome long established behaviour patterns.

I looked up the surgeon, rather quickly & he seems to have the right training/credentials & apparently has done bariatric surgery on a lot of prominent Indians. His hospital's web site makes it clear they're a medical tourism destination so I'm going to assume that standards can be fairly high. Here's the hospital web site:

http://www.saifeehospital.com/index.html
__________________
Searching for a dream to run after & catch!
CanadaSue is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to CanadaSue For This Useful Post:
drummagick (02-12-2017), Hollyberry (02-15-2017), Mousehound (02-13-2017)
Old 02-12-2017, 11:31 AM   #9
Cactus Az
Senior Member
 
Cactus Az's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: held hostage in NM
Posts: 1,297
Thanks: 2,887
Thanked 725 Times in 282 Posts
I had a 700+ lb. patient years ago.

He was NPO ( nothing by mouth) due to vomiting.

His mother swore we were "starving " him.

When asked the patient was asked about what he had eaten today he replied...6 Big Macs, 15 orders of fries, 4 chocolate shakes. All for lunch. They lived 20 miles from the nearest McDs. On the Res.

We got him to the big city, but he eventually died from aspiration Pneumonia.
__________________
[I]I have figured out I'm not a half glass full/empty person, I'm a "be grateful you have a damn glass AND something in it!
Cactus Az is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Cactus Az For This Useful Post:
drummagick (02-12-2017)
Old 02-12-2017, 11:42 AM   #10
NowVoyager
Senior Level 6
 
NowVoyager's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: East of paradise and west of tomorrow
Posts: 8,965
Thanks: 21,858
Thanked 8,522 Times in 3,451 Posts
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cactus Az View Post
I had a 700+ lb. patient years ago.

He was NPO ( nothing by mouth) due to vomiting.

His mother swore we were "starving " him.

When asked the patient was asked about what he had eaten today he replied...6 Big Macs, 15 orders of fries, 4 chocolate shakes. All for lunch. They lived 20 miles from the nearest McDs. On the Res.

We got him to the big city, but he eventually died from aspiration Pneumonia.
Ignoring the obvious that *someone* was fetching his Big Macs, how in the hell does a person afford that much, for one person, for one meal???!!!!

I'm not a fast food person, but I'm going to guess that must have been at least $20, several years ago.

$20 for one meal?? And forget breakfast and lunch. What about anyone else in the family eating: that's several hundred dollars a month, for one person, to have 'lunch'.
__________________
The untold want, by life and land ne’er granted,
Now, Voyager, sail thou forth, to seek and find.

Walt Whitman
NowVoyager is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2017, 11:56 AM   #11
CanadaSue
SuperModerator
 
CanadaSue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: In my gardens or online
Posts: 35,508
Blog Entries: 28
Thanks: 2,486
Thanked 11,047 Times in 5,057 Posts
The power of personality is staggering, isn't it? Many of these bariatric patients are too heavy to get their own food. Maybe they can make it to the kitchen & back but there's no way they can shop for all the food they consume & I wonder how they begin to pay for it. In other words, they're getting a lot of 'help'.

In a 'normal' family, either their helpers would refuse to buy anything other than healthy food, would feed the obese smaller amounts of healthier food or wouldn't get involved at all. When I watch those TLC shows, increasingly I look at the dynamics among the family members. The first noticeable thing is that most or all of the other family members are overweight although not to the same degree. So their ideas of healthy food & normal portions is already warped. The bedridden eaters are very passive/aggressive, very manipulative, in full on Pity Party mode & the denial runs deep. Increasingly, the surgeon on the show is calling the patients AND the families on their dysfunctional behaviours. I'm sure that's always been part of the process but they're finally showing it on the programs.
__________________
Searching for a dream to run after & catch!
CanadaSue is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to CanadaSue For This Useful Post:
Cactus Az (02-13-2017), drummagick (02-12-2017)
Old 02-12-2017, 12:04 PM   #12
Mama Alanna
Eat ALL the cookies!
 
Mama Alanna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In front of the computer or the sewing machine.
Posts: 9,382
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 5,222 Times in 2,048 Posts
I had a friend who weighed, at a guess, 500-600 lbs, HALF this poor woman's weight. Her condition was initually much better; she was not only mobile, but fairly active. And the doctors in TWO first-world countries, the US and Finland, refused to touch her because of the risk that she would die on the table. They wanted her to lose significant amounts of weight beforehand. And she did try, and she did lose visible amounts.

She developed diabetes, got chronic infections in the skin folds, and started to go downhill rapidly. Over the course of 5-6 years, she went from being fully mobile to unable to manage even shallow steps with a cane; to needing occasional use of a wheelchair; to needing the chair full-time. The last time I saw her, she was practically bedridden. She died in her mid-50's.

I don't believe tthe woman in the OP is likely to make it.
__________________
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
We have enough gun control. What we need now is idiot control.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Mama Alanna is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mama Alanna For This Useful Post:
drummagick (02-12-2017)
Old 02-12-2017, 12:16 PM   #13
dharma
Git it, booger.
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 5,590
Thanks: 1,082
Thanked 2,552 Times in 1,007 Posts
Her surgeon will not manage her post-op; that job will go to the intensivist. You do not want a surgeon managing complicated medical issues (not a dis; you don't want an internist pulling a gall bag, either).

As a first-year resident on Pulmonary, I spent 36 hours trying to get a bariatric surgery patient to fly. She began third-spacing almost immediately after surgery (her vessels began to leak fluid and she began to swell up). That presents one with a quandary: give fluids, she gets more edematous, hold fluids and her pressure/perfusion drops. Obviously much more complicated than that, many issues that you try to juggle all at once as things go progressively farther out of control, but, in any case... My attending saw the writing on the wall, I couldn't give up—idealistic youth, etc. She died.

As a third year student on surgery, I walked in on a 34 y.o.post-op gall bladder to begin rounds. She was gazing at the ceiling. I realized what had happened, and began compressions while yelling for help—just as her husband and two young children walked into the room.

She had thrown a clot.

Here's my favorite Big Patient surgery story. It was thirty years ago, and surgery was done open. The surgeon makes his opening incision on a huge patient and begins to dissect down. He works away for 45 minutes, deeper and deeper. Suddenly, he gets a funny look on his face. He is puzzled. He asks for forceps, reaches down into the wound, grasps something, and slowly pulls up . . . sheet.

He had missed the abdominal cavity entirely and dissected down to the surgical table.

Don't see how that could happen? Look down at yourself, think about the size of your belly, then surround that with 400 pounds of meat. Target doesn't look that large, necessarily, does it?

I have a zillion stories about fat, and most of them don't have happy endings.

Obese people do not realize it, but they live their lives walking along the edge of a precipice. They have no physiologic reserve; an insult that would cause most of us to stumble a little sends them right over the edge. If your blood pressure is high or your sugars are starting to get out of whack or your knees are aching and popping, you're already in trouble; your body has been trying to keep up, and it's failing.
dharma is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to dharma For This Useful Post:
AndreaCA (02-12-2017), drummagick (02-12-2017), Mousehound (02-13-2017), NowVoyager (02-12-2017), rb. (02-12-2017), rryan (02-15-2017), spinnerholic (02-14-2017)
Old 02-12-2017, 12:27 PM   #14
CanadaSue
SuperModerator
 
CanadaSue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: In my gardens or online
Posts: 35,508
Blog Entries: 28
Thanks: 2,486
Thanked 11,047 Times in 5,057 Posts
As a nurse, I never looked after anyone close to that heavy. The few post op cases I cared for who were significantly overweight - iirc, all were urgent surgeries based on issues that probably wouldn't have been issues, if not for the excess weight. And... even if it was a 'clean' surgery, simple incision, easy procedure - it took forever for many of these folks to truly stabilize.

dharma, you're right, any little hiccup potentially was catastrophic. We always worried about clots, post-op hypertension, the slightest rise in temperature had us scurrying to get labs ordered, healing was slow & trying to mobilize these folks... this was back when we nurses & the orderlies had to do it; I'm surprised more health care staff don't end up with more serious back issues. They couldn't get up soon enough or long enough.

I don't know how hospitals today are managing.
__________________
Searching for a dream to run after & catch!
CanadaSue is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to CanadaSue For This Useful Post:
drummagick (02-12-2017)
Old 02-12-2017, 12:56 PM   #15
Potemkin
Omne ignotum pro magnifico
 
Potemkin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 27,931
Blog Entries: 3
Thanks: 110
Thanked 5,659 Times in 2,809 Posts
Quote:
What about her mother & sister, who are said to have been looking after her at home? THEY, assuming she lives, are going to need a lot of help to overcome long established behaviour patterns.
I watch those show also with super morbidly obese.

I know the show s edited but it seems like the first thing they want is the surfer. That is the goal. They think if they have it, it will all be magic.

I think the first thing that needs to happen is about 6-8 months counseling of the enablers. How to deal with the manipulative nature of the patient, food selection, etc.

Add in the patient counseling then some group counseling.

I think with just that you would likely get the weight loss all the barbaric surgeons, at least the ethical ones, require of the patient to show commitment.
__________________
“The price of freedom is the willingness to do sudden battle anywhere, any time and with utter recklessness.”
― Robert A. Heinlein, The Puppet Masters
Potemkin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2017, 01:26 PM   #16
Mama Alanna
Eat ALL the cookies!
 
Mama Alanna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In front of the computer or the sewing machine.
Posts: 9,382
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 5,222 Times in 2,048 Posts
DD1 and her husband lost a gaming friend who weighed in at 650 just before bariatric surgery. He coded in the hospital just from lying down. He'd been sleeping in a recliner for several years, because he couldn't breathe lying down. I don't know if he didn't tell them, or if they didn't believe him, or if they DID believe him but thought with proper monitoring he'd be OK.
__________________
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
We have enough gun control. What we need now is idiot control.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Mama Alanna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-12-2017, 01:40 PM   #17
dharma
Git it, booger.
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 5,590
Thanks: 1,082
Thanked 2,552 Times in 1,007 Posts
Pickwickian Syndrome, one of those diagnoses where I think the eponym is superior to the New Improved terminology. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obesit...ation_syndrome
dharma is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to dharma For This Useful Post:
AndreaCA (02-13-2017), drummagick (02-12-2017)
Old 02-12-2017, 06:46 PM   #18
drummagick
new age airy-fairy hippie
 
drummagick's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: North Central Washington State
Posts: 6,985
Thanks: 2,913
Thanked 2,916 Times in 1,191 Posts
I have to say, I am totally fascinated by medical discussions.
drummagick is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to drummagick For This Useful Post:
Feather (02-13-2017), spinnerholic (02-14-2017)
Old 02-13-2017, 06:29 PM   #19
Mousehound
Senior Level 6
 
Mousehound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 9,951
Thanks: 4,314
Thanked 2,860 Times in 1,267 Posts
I know there is a fine line between a patient's free will, and what many could see as abuse. If you ask me, feeding a person to death is abuse. Animals that get too fat are taken away from their owners, so why do we have to accept humans doing this to each other? Why did I have to stand by watching a woman drink herself to death, although she couldn't get to a store to buy any alcohol on her own. Why do we have to wait until someone needs extreme medical care before the law allows us to do something for people like this? Yet another reason why I am no longer a nurse...just too soft I guess.
__________________
There are always dozens of reasons why something "can't" be done. That's no excuse in my book. If you want it bad enough, you find a way. That's how life works for grown ups. -- Booger

Don't be afraid to be open-minded. Your brain won't fall out.

Calorie Counter
Mousehound is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Mousehound For This Useful Post:
AndreaCA (02-14-2017), Feather (02-13-2017)
Old 02-13-2017, 06:40 PM   #20
Mama Alanna
Eat ALL the cookies!
 
Mama Alanna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: In front of the computer or the sewing machine.
Posts: 9,382
Thanks: 1,593
Thanked 5,222 Times in 2,048 Posts
I wonder if she had a broken leg or something else that immobilized her when she was a child, so her mother crammed her with food to "make her healthy again." There are still people out there who believe that a fat child is a healthy child. I took quite a bit of flak from aunts and uncles when DD1 was little; because she wasn't fat they saw her as "poorly" and admonished me to fill her plate to overflowing and make her eat it all.
__________________
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
We have enough gun control. What we need now is idiot control.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Mama Alanna is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-13-2017, 08:27 PM   #21
CanadaSue
SuperModerator
 
CanadaSue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: In my gardens or online
Posts: 35,508
Blog Entries: 28
Thanks: 2,486
Thanked 11,047 Times in 5,057 Posts
MA - you may be on to something; certainly a possible explanation for some of the issues we're facing with excess weight in our society.

My grandparents all saw food as security & love. They grew up dirt poor, missed many a meal & I suspect took more pride in feeding their families well, (amply), then they did in home ownership. Want to reward a child? Feed it. Comfort a family member or friend? Feed it. Show love? Offer food. Gawd help you if you got sick... you might recover from the illness but I'm not so sure about the constant shoving of food in your face!

It was a sticking point to some extent in my family. My aunt would get really upset when I wouldn't let her stuff my kids full of ice cream & other treats... just as I was about to take them home for a meal. Her idea of a normal portion was an adult sized amount of food. She was totally convinced that children outgrew 'puppy fat'.

Overweight children certainly can get past excess weight, with sympathetic, knowledgeable management co-ordinated between parents & a primary practitioner but if they keep eating too much and/or the wrong stuff... no they won't.

I think one of the factors easily controlled is the unfettered, free eating I see a lot of. Kids don't have to wait for meal times but can start grazing the second they have a pang of anything approaching hunger. Are parents other adults may think they're bad parents if we make them wait the extra 20 minutes until supper?
__________________
Searching for a dream to run after & catch!
CanadaSue is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to CanadaSue For This Useful Post:
NowVoyager (02-13-2017)
Old 02-13-2017, 09:01 PM   #22
Feather
Secretly laughing at the cat
 
Feather's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Iowa
Posts: 9,626
Thanks: 24,281
Thanked 3,755 Times in 1,512 Posts
I decided a few weeks ago that if the weather was nice I would take the kids to the park as a Valentine gift. I don't want them to grow up thinking food=love.
__________________
Forgive your enemies - it messes with their minds.
Feather is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Feather For This Useful Post:
AndreaCA (02-14-2017), Mousehound (02-14-2017), NowVoyager (02-13-2017)
Old 02-13-2017, 09:32 PM   #23
CanadaSue
SuperModerator
 
CanadaSue's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: In my gardens or online
Posts: 35,508
Blog Entries: 28
Thanks: 2,486
Thanked 11,047 Times in 5,057 Posts
It can be an important part of love, Feather as long as the kids understand there's more to love than that.

Your grand kids know you are all about love - no matter in what form it comes.
__________________
Searching for a dream to run after & catch!
CanadaSue is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to CanadaSue For This Useful Post:
AndreaCA (02-14-2017), Feather (02-13-2017), NowVoyager (02-13-2017)
Old 02-14-2017, 12:15 AM   #24
AndreaCA
Senior Level 3
 
AndreaCA's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Central California
Posts: 3,954
Thanks: 9,267
Thanked 3,260 Times in 1,462 Posts
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/ar...ist-3-770.html

__________________
"You can solve all the world's problems in a garden." Geoff Lawton
AndreaCA is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to AndreaCA For This Useful Post:
Feather (02-14-2017), Hollyberry (02-15-2017), NowVoyager (02-14-2017)
Old 02-14-2017, 04:43 PM   #25
spinnerholic
Senior Level 3
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Virginia
Posts: 3,904
Thanks: 1,802
Thanked 1,435 Times in 419 Posts
T%he graph above doesn't include Canada? How come? No fat folks there?
__________________
May each day bring you sunshine and joy in life, in large and small servings.

Peace on Earth and Goodwill to All.
spinnerholic is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
500kg, bariatric, sugery, woman

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright © Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.