Go Back   This Blue Marble, a Global Current Events Discussion Forum > Health and Medicine > Alternative and Survival Medicine

Alternative and Survival Medicine Investigations and discussion into health systems, practices, and products that are not considered part of conventional medicine.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-13-2009, 09:04 PM   #1
MaxTheKnife
Genuine Arkansas Peckerwood
 
MaxTheKnife's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 1,007
Thanks: 26
Thanked 171 Times in 93 Posts
Default Beauty Berry as insect repellant and insecticide?

Well, sometimes we learn something if we're not careful. I was clearing some brush yesterday and hacked down a good bit of Beauty Berry. BG has been talking about the benefits of Beauty Berry off and on and I got the jist that a tea should be made from all parts of the plant as an effective repellant and possibly insecticide against ticks and mosquitos. Thought provoking, to say the least.

So I collected an armful of Beauty Berry branches and broke them up and steeped them in lightly boiling water and then put a rock on top and let the whole mess sit overnight. It made a tea of very dark color and after straining I put some in a spray bottle and spritzed my lower body with it before hitting the brush once again when it was cool. I still picked up some seed ticks but they were acting stupid as if they were dying when I found them. The jury is still out but it seems to be a good start on something that is readily available to most folks as far as I know (I may have made a mistake by boiling the mess!). We have Beauty Berry growing most everywhere around here so it's no problem making up a batch of tea. There is a slight tingle as the tea dries on your skin. But then you don't even know you have it on. The ticks apparently get sick and begin to die soon after attaching to your skin. Nice!

Anybody else have any experience with Beauty Berry as a repellant or insecticide? Enquiring minds want to know!
MaxTheKnife is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 09:15 PM   #2
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
http://www.bioone.org/doi/abs/10.160...urnalCode=ecen

http://www.ghorganics.com/OldTimeMos...gainsTicks.htm

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jf8028072

http://www.wvu.edu/~agexten/lookwhat/lwot307.pdf
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 09:23 PM   #3
Renegade
Certified Southern Moderator
 
Renegade's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Florida Panhandle
Posts: 7,665
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Never tried it for ticks, but you can just rub the leaves on you and keep the skeeters away.
__________________
..
"The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not.."
- Thomas Jefferson
Renegade is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2009, 09:50 PM   #4
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
The tea was easy to do. I've got some in a spritz bottle. Like Max said, the ticks that bit acted like they were dying. From what I've read, the compounds in the plant are highly effective. They're even using those compounds for fireant control.
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 03:01 AM   #5
Old Hawk
Elderest
 
Old Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 1,838
Thanks: 8
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Another link

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0703091932.htm

We are rather desperately looking for a mosquito repellent that is safe for little ones and infants. Haven't found that info so far.

I don't know if it grows round my place.

Is this it?

http://www.arhomeandgarden.org/plant...y_11-21-08.htm

OH
__________________
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. If you do it today and like it you can do it again tomorrow.

Last edited by Old Hawk; 08-15-2009 at 03:26 AM.
Old Hawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 11:56 AM   #6
Old Hawk
Elderest
 
Old Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 1,838
Thanks: 8
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I printed a picture of the plant and showed it to SIL this morning. He hopped on the four wheeler and within minutes we were rubbing the leaves on our bods. We will be working in skeetery places today so will soon know how that works.

A pot of leaves, stems, and new little berries is brewing to make a spritz. We really need for this to work. The new baby's mama had been using deet on her and we got that stopped but need a replacement. The 3 year old is coming out later so we can try it on her.

Questions:

How much experience is available for using it as a spritz?

Can the chopped up plant be dried, saved, and still make an effective spritz?

How long can the spritz be stored?

We will have to supply others with the spritz as they will not have access to the plants.

Having the ticks bite and then die doesn't seem like the best of all possible worlds.

Off to face skeeterville.

OH
__________________
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. If you do it today and like it you can do it again tomorrow.
Old Hawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 04:23 PM   #7
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
It might be easiest to comment on within your text:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old Hawk View Post
I printed a picture of the plant and showed it to SIL this morning. He hopped on the four wheeler and within minutes we were rubbing the leaves on our bods. We will be working in skeetery places today so will soon know how that works.

A pot of leaves, stems, and new little berries is brewing to make a spritz. We really need for this to work. The new baby's mama had been using deet on her and we got that stopped but need a replacement. The 3 year old is coming out later so we can try it on her.

Questions:

How much experience is available for using it as a spritz?

We've been using it for a few days with no noticeable ill effects either through absorption or directly on the skin. I plan to research the compounds and see what I can find out about them as far as toxicity goes.

Can the chopped up plant be dried, saved, and still make an effective spritz?

I don't know

How long can the spritz be stored?

Got a batch that has been reduced gently by 3/4ths. The plan is to hot fill a quart jar and pop a lid on it. Then we'll store it in the fridge and use as needed. The only other way I can think of is to tincture it then dilute it with water for the spritz. All I can suggest is to experiment.

We will have to supply others with the spritz as they will not have access to the plants.

Having the ticks bite and then die doesn't seem like the best of all possible worlds.

I agree, they still bit and the bites are itchy but at least they didn't release to bite again. We're going to try the stronger solution and see if that helps to keep them from digging in the first time. I'll report back on that.

Off to face skeeterville.

Let us know how that works out!

OH
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 06:28 PM   #8
Susan4
4ster
 
Susan4's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Missouri
Posts: 3,136
Thanks: 157
Thanked 123 Times in 91 Posts
Toxicology tenet: Everything is poison depending on the dose. If beauty-berry is making ticks sick/die it can be toxic to you too.

Deet appears to work with skeeters IIRC by masking your emission of CO2 which is what attracts them, it's not a direct poison. Why so averse to it? Permanone (permethrin) is more a concern as it is an insecticide and should only be used on clothing, not skin.
Susan4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-15-2009, 07:44 PM   #9
Old Hawk
Elderest
 
Old Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 1,838
Thanks: 8
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Deet is a wonderful repellent for skeeters, ticks, chiggers, buffalo gnats so I'm pretty sure it isn't just masking co2 emissions. If one spot is missed mosquitos and gnats will find it. We use it, sparingly. If walking about in cleared areas I spray it on my shoes and socks, pants legs from the knee down and just one band on the skin around the ankle. In brushy areas I apply more accordingly.

When mosquitos are really busy I need for the deet to be applied lightly on all exposed skin.

If I had to I would bathe in it rather than to to have another round of tick fever.

But, there has always been controversy over the hazards of deet and it does enter the bloodstream and there is some serious evidence that it affects the nervous system in a harmful way.

Google and read all day.

http://www2.sandbox.google.com/searc...=Google+Search

It is much harder to keep the wee ones and babies covered up. Some folks we know are applying deet all over the little bodies.

So the search goes on for effective and safe alternatives.

Today we are experimenting with this one for effectiveness on ourselves and looking for more answers.

Also there is the prepper need to have alternates in case deet were not available at all.

OH
__________________
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. If you do it today and like it you can do it again tomorrow.

Last edited by Old Hawk; 08-16-2009 at 12:37 AM.
Old Hawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 12:41 AM   #10
Old Hawk
Elderest
 
Old Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 1,838
Thanks: 8
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
The skeeters were not out much today so we didn't find out anything. Decided not to apply to the little one till we know more.

OH
__________________
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. If you do it today and like it you can do it again tomorrow.
Old Hawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 04:01 AM   #11
Mousehound
Senior Level 6
 
Mousehound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 9,911
Thanks: 4,256
Thanked 2,777 Times in 1,239 Posts
For later use of your brew, I would freeze it in ice cube trays to be used when you need it. Break out the cubes, and store those in bags or whatever. You should be able to store as much as you need that way.
__________________
There are always dozens of reasons why something "can't" be done. That's no excuse in my book. If you want it bad enough, you find a way. That's how life works for grown ups. -- Booger

Don't be afraid to be open-minded. Your brain won't fall out.

Calorie Counter
Mousehound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 12:30 PM   #12
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
Last night I was sitting on the front porch and was mobbed by mosquitos. I sprayed the area around where I was sitting and the mosquitos completely vanished. I didn't see another one the entire time I was there.

Here's a repellency study for Callicarpenal and intermedeol the main repellent compounds found in Beautyberry:



http://seekspace.resip.ac.cn/handle/...2137?mode=full

Callicarpenal (13, 14, 15, 16-tetranor-3-cleroden-12-al) and intermedeol [(4S,5S,7R,10S)-eudesm-11-en-4-ol], isolated from American beautyberry, Callicarpa americana (Lamiaceae), were evaluated in laboratory bioassays for repellent activity against host-seeking nymphs of the blacklegged tick, Ixodes scapularis, and lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. A strip of organdy cloth treated with test solution was doubly wrapped (treatment on outer layer) around the middle phalanx of a forefinger and ticks released on the fingertip. Callicarpenal and intermedeol, at 155 nmole/cm² cloth repelled 98 and 96% of I. scapularis nymphs, respectively. Dose response tests with I. scapularis nymphs showed no difference in repellency among callicarpenal, intermedeol and Deet (N,N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide), however, SS220 ((1S,2'S)-2-methylpiperidinyl-3-cyclohexene-1-carboxamide) was significantly more repellent than the other compounds. Callicarpenal, at 155 nmole/cm² cloth, repelled 100 and 53.3% of I. scapularis nymphs at 3 and 4 h, respectively, after the cloth was treated, whereas intermedeol repelled 72.5% of I. scapularis nymphs 3 h after treatment. In comparison with the results obtained with I. scapularis, callicarpenal, intermedeol, Deet and SS220 were less effective against A. americanum. Only intermedeol and SS220 repelled significantly more A. americanum than ethanol controls at 155 nmole compound/cm² cloth. At 1,240 nmole/cm² cloth, callicarpenal and intermedeol repelled 20 and 40% of A. americanum nymphs.
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 12:33 PM   #13
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
http://www.federallabs.org/news/clas...es/0607-11.jsp

Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists have isolated a natural compound, callicarpenal, from the American beautyberry that has been shown to repel mosquitoes, ticks, and fire ants. Callicarpenal, an all-natural insect repellent, is an alternative to commercially available synthetic repellents and more effective than currently available natural repellents on the market. Callicarpenal is as effective as DEET, and more effective than picaridin (Bayrepel) in the bioassays used against mosquitoes, and is also as effective as DEET and picardin against the deer tick. It could be a good alternative to synthetic repellents such as DEET and picaridin, and could be marketed as an allnatural repellent. Natural pesticides (repellents) are typically less harmful to the environment, more specific to particular insects, and public perception is typically better. Certainly DEET and picaridin are excellent repellents; however, the industry is searching for "natural" alternatives that are better accepted than DEET. Callicarpenal is potentially a safer and perhaps more effective insect repellent. The market potential is huge because 38 percent of Americans use a DEET-based product every year. Using aerosols creams, it could be applied topically.
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 12:38 PM   #14
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
http://skagit.wsu.edu/mg/2007AA/090707.pdf

An ARS research team extracted natural compounds from American beautyberry leaves, then tested their capacity to repel mosquito species that spread yellow fever and malaria, and ticks that spread Lyme disease. One compound, callicarpenal, repelled mosquitoes and deer tick nymphs as effectively as the commercial repellent DEET. The USDA has applied for a patent on callicarpenal, but it must undergo toxicity trials before
testing on humans can begin.
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 01:47 PM   #15
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
COMPOUNDS, COMPOSITIONS AND METHODS FOR REPELLING BLOOD-FEEDING ARTHROPODS AND DETERRING THEIR LANDING AND FEEDING

http://www.faqs.org/patents/app/20090069407
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-16-2009, 01:59 PM   #16
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
Old-Time Mosquito Remedy May Work Against Ticks, Too

By Luis Pons

A granddad's wisdom, already helpful in the fight against mosquitoes, may also prove useful in battling disease-spreading ticks.

Last year, Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists in Oxford, Miss., isolated compounds from a plant called American beautyberry that enable its crushed leaves to repel mosquitoes.

This work, led by chemist Charles Cantrell at the ARS Natural Products Utilization Research Unit in Oxford, was inspired by a tip another ARS scientist—botanist Charles Bryson in Stoneville, Miss.—got long ago from his grandfather: that beautyberry was used in northeastern Mississippi to protect people and farm-work animals from biting bugs.

Now ARS scientists in Beltsville, Md., have shown that two beautyberry compounds—callicarpenal and intermedeol—may effectively repel blacklegged ticks as well.

Blacklegged ticks are the principal carrier of bacteria that in humans cause Lyme disease, an affliction known for its fevers, headaches and bull's-eye rash. Left untreated, this disease can cause severe and chronic illness.

Blacklegged ticks, Ixodes scapularis, are the principal carrier of bacteria that cause Lyme disease in humans. Preliminary studies by ARS scientists in Maryland have shown that compounds from American beautyberry plants may have use as repellents against them. Click the images for more information about them.

ARS entomologists John Carroll, in the Animal Parasitic Diseases Laboratory, Beltsville, and Jerome Klun, in the Chemicals Affecting Insect Behavior Laboratory, also in Beltsville, tested the compounds by administering them to cloth strips wrapped around a person's finger in dosages at which the commercial repellent DEET repels ticks.

The treated strips repelled more than 95 percent of blacklegged tick nymphs.

Callicarpenal did especially well in a separate duration test, repelling all the blacklegged ticks tested for three hours after application, and 53 percent after four hours.

The researchers also tested the natural compounds against nymphs of lone star ticks, which transmit potentially serious human diseases known as ehrlichioses.

The two compounds, as well as DEET, were considerably more potent against blacklegged ticks than against lone star ticks. An experimental repellent developed by ARS and known as SS220 was most effective against the lone star variety.

While the findings are preliminary, the beautyberry compounds' usage history leads Carroll to believe that callicarpenal and intermedeol have potential for human use.


http://www.ghorganics.com/OldTimeMosquitoRemedyMayWorkAgainsTicks.htm
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-17-2009, 01:32 AM   #17
Old Hawk
Elderest
 
Old Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 1,838
Thanks: 8
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
I am using the brew full strength and applied it several times today. It did repel skeeters very well but needed reapplication at least every 2 or 3 hours.

OH
__________________
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. If you do it today and like it you can do it again tomorrow.
Old Hawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2009, 02:39 PM   #18
Old Hawk
Elderest
 
Old Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 1,838
Thanks: 8
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
We have thoroughly tested Max's Beautyberry prep. It is an excellent repellent for mosquitos. Spritzing an area keeps the critters away for a while. Lightly applied to exposed skin it keeps them away. The odor is pleasant, it leaves little residue, and doesn't stain.

We didn't see any effect at all on ticks, chiggers, flies or ants. Have not had opportunity to test on gnats, fleas, or yellow jackets..

We left the preparation unrefrigerated all this time and it is still fresh.

We used the entire plant as Max did, the berries were newly formed no where near ripe.

As it only takes a few minutes to prepare a batch we think the dried plant will do for storage.

We will definitely use it as an alternative to deet for mosquitos.

OH
__________________
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. If you do it today and like it you can do it again tomorrow.
Old Hawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2010, 03:29 AM   #19
Old Hawk
Elderest
 
Old Hawk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 1,838
Thanks: 8
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
My spritz bottle of Beauty Berry sat on the porch all winter, froze and thawed with the weather.

The skeeters are back. The BB spritz still smells very nice and still repels them. Seemed to repel gnats too while they were here recently.

OH
__________________
Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today. If you do it today and like it you can do it again tomorrow.
Old Hawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-27-2010, 01:24 PM   #20
Ought Six
Lifetime Level 3
 
Ought Six's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 35,164
Blog Entries: 15
Thanks: 180
Thanked 392 Times in 328 Posts
Arrow

BTW, DEET is mildly neurotoxic. Also, there is an article here (ignore the title) about mosquitoes who are no longer repelled by DEET.

I use lemon eucalyptus oil, which repels just about all bugs. The only drawback is that you have to reapply it every couple hours. Here is a good source:

http://www.auroma.com/catalog/Profes...lLemonScented/

It says 'lemon scented', but that is wrong. Lemon eucalyptus, aka Eucalyptus citriodora, has a citrus-smelling oil naturally. There are no additives or lemon scents in the oil. I got a kilogram of the stuff, which is about a liter. It will probably last me the next ten years. This stuff smells amazing. It also cleanses and heals the lungs and sinuses.
Ought Six is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2014, 01:47 AM   #21
JennyJenny
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2014
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default Maybe it's in the preparation

I'm certainly no chemist, but I do recall reading recipes and preparation methods for "pot brownies" (purely out of curiosity - I've never made or eaten pot brownies myself). But what I found surprising was that simply pouring pot into brownie batter (in any amount) won't work. According to many recipes, the only way to make the cannabinoids in baked goods active or bio-available in food is to slow-cook the buds of the plant in a fat for several hours in a Crock Pot. The drug's mind-altering chemical compounds become bound to the cooking fat, which is then used to transform any ordinary brownie recipe into "special brownies". (When butter is used as the fat, it's called "Cannabutter").
I have no idea if the same applies to this situation, but maybe just cooking the leaves in water for a short time isn't enough to release the insect-repelling chemical compounds held within them. I'm going to try slow-cooking them overnight in my Crock Pot in one of the oils tomorrow and report back with my results.

To be continued...
JennyJenny is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to JennyJenny For This Useful Post:
blue gecko (10-03-2014)
Old 10-03-2014, 10:19 AM   #22
blue gecko
Simplify, Do or Die
 
blue gecko's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Arkansas
Posts: 10,517
Thanks: 2,336
Thanked 4,161 Times in 1,722 Posts
Do let us know! Welcome aboard!!


I was doing a little more reading on this process just a few days ago and the study I found then used the crushed leaves simply soaked in water. I also found that the ripe berries are edible and make a nice jelly. So, I've tried eating a few They have an unusual flavor that reminds me a bit of lavender and the seed is very small. I plan on collecting enough to make jelly and freeze them till I'm ready to use them.
__________________
Life is short. Break the rules. Forgive quickly.
Kiss slowly. Love truly. Laugh uncontrollably,
and never regret anything that made you smile.


Women are Angels and when someone breaks our wings we simply continue to fly...on a broomstick. We are flexible like that
blue gecko is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
beauty, berry, insect, insecticide, repellant

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:40 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright © Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.