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Old 09-03-2008, 02:02 PM   #1
drummagick
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Default Using home canned hamburger

I'm going to bite the bullet and use a pint of my canned hamburger in spaghetti sauce.

Can I just skim off what fat there is and heat it directly in the sauce? What is the minimum temp and for what period of time?

Or should I be bringing it to a boil in the liquid I canned it in first?

I can't seem to find my canning book I picked up with all that info in it!

tia!
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Old 09-03-2008, 02:04 PM   #2
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I like to bring my sauce to at least simmer first to get the flavors to meld after I've added everything.

.....Alan.
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Old 09-03-2008, 02:10 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.T. Hagan View Post
I like to bring my sauce to at least simmer first to get the flavors to meld after I've added everything.

.....Alan.
Yes, but it seems like I read that home canned meat needed to be boiled for like 10 minutes or something. Or maybe it was brought to a certain temp for a certain period of time before eating it.
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Old 09-03-2008, 02:17 PM   #4
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The accepted Conventional Wisdom is that home-canned foods should be boiled for at least ten minutes before serving. This is because botulinum toxin is sensitive to heat and will break down even if the botulinum spores are more durable. If you have any doubts about your procedure then give the sauce at least a good half-hour simmer.

For my part with foods that I personally canned I do not do this because I know for a fact that I followed correct procedure. This is a matter that everyone has to come to their own conclusion about though.

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Old 09-03-2008, 02:20 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.T. Hagan View Post
The accepted Conventional Wisdom is that home-canned foods should be boiled for at least ten minutes before serving. This is because botulinum toxin is sensitive to heat and will break down even if the botulinum spores are more durable. If you have any doubts about your procedure then give the sauce at least a good half-hour simmer.

For my part with foods that I personally canned I do not do this because I know for a fact that I followed correct procedure. This is a matter that everyone has to come to their own conclusion about though.

.....Alan.

Well, I followed correct procedure, pack meat hot with hot liquid. Process for certain amount of time at certain pressure. As a matter of fact, I think I may have added an extra 5 minutes on. But this was my first time canning meat, or anything, by myself and I'm ascared.

I think I'll just simmer it most of the afternoon.


Thank you, Alan!
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Old 09-03-2008, 03:28 PM   #6
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Well, it looks ok in the jar. It's not green and there's no weird colored froth.

It smells like hamburger. The fat did not go rancid and I canned it in May.

I've got it on a low boil in it's broth now, and will simmer it more in the sauce with some browned Italian sausage.

How long does it take for symptoms of botulism to show up
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Old 09-05-2008, 09:19 PM   #7
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Say, I was just portioning out the last of the lasagne for freezing and realized that none of us are in the hospital on life support.
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Old 09-07-2008, 01:56 PM   #8
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How was the taste of the burger meat?
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Old 09-07-2008, 03:34 PM   #9
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How was the taste of the burger meat?

Well, I didn't taste it before I dumped it in the sauce. Seemed to be just fine though. I canned it in beef stock for more flavor.

I can hardly wait for more sales on ground beef so I can put away some more!
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Old 09-07-2008, 07:36 PM   #10
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What I have been doing at the local grocery store for ground meat Drum is. I will pick out a few on sale boneless roasts preferably with some fat on the meat. I ask the meat person if they will double grind it for me. They are always happy to do it. If they aren't busy that is. I also ask the same of pork roasts.

I then mix the two together to get a nice ground meat mixture as well as ground pork for home made sausages. That way I know the ground meat has not been mass ground in some factory somewhere in the world.

Also, if the s ever was to htf your family will need all the fat you can manage. Personally I think more and more what is happening is we are slowly sliding down into the S rather than being hit one hard one, so that we know we have been hit.

I've nothing against some fat in the hamburger. Fat is what gives food the flavour. Anyway, everyone has their own opinion on that and you for sure don't need to agree with what I think. I'm just sharing.
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Old 09-07-2008, 09:19 PM   #11
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That's a good idea, getting it custom ground.

The first batch of meat I canned, I drained it but wasn't all obsessive compulsive about it, and ended up with maybe 1/2" of fat at the top of the jars. My thinking on that was the same as you mentioned, in an emergency situation, you're going to want all that fat.

Then I read online at a different forum where people had posted you have to get ALL THAT FAT out of there before you can the meat or it will go rancid instantly and kill you when you eat it. Well, it wasn't that bad but the person was definitely not pro-fat. He went so far as to put all his browned hamburger in a colander and pouring boiling water over it before canning, to get out as much fat as possible.

So I'll strain off most of the fat, but not all, and skim it off the top if I want or leave it be if I need to.



Can you home can sausage patties? I was browning some sausage today and wondering that.
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Old 09-07-2008, 09:30 PM   #12
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I think the only technical reason to be picky about getting fat removed is that it can cause seal failures if any gets between the glass and the sealing compound as the jar evacuates air while being processed.
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Old 09-07-2008, 10:01 PM   #13
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In a long-term emergency that fat would be very valuable should physical labor demands greatly increase.

BUT that has to be weighed against the fact that it's entirely likely you'll end up eating the meat in the ordinary everyday where many of us have reason to watch our dietary fat intake. I find it better to store my fats separately rather than in the meat we're going to eat frequently.

That said, fat in the meat is not going to go rancid quickly if it was properly processed. Given enough years it'll slowly go over, but we are talking years.

Too much fat between the jar lid and rim can interfere with achieving a good seal, but many people do leave a lot of fat in their meat and still manage to achieve a good seal if proper technique is used. Especially with meats it's important not to heat the canner too fast nor cool it too rapidly. Both can lead to forcing fluid (and the fat) out of the jars. An even build up and a steady cool down is what is wanted.

.....Alan.
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Old 09-07-2008, 10:13 PM   #14
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This deals with the fat issue, but may come off as a bit of bragging, too.

I entered a jar of venison that I'd cut into stew meat size pieces in our local county fair 5 or so years ago. Deer doesn't have much fat at all, but when it came out of the canner and cooled to room temp, it had a thin white layer of fat on top. And I won a blue ribbon for it!

The judges are state home economics people connected with the state Ag dept and they are supposed to be the experts on home canning and such. Since those experts gave me a blue ribbon for it, they clearly found nothing wrong with that fat in it.

When I used that meat, I didn't remove the fat, the meat was delicious and I hope someone will kindly give us a deer this year so we can pressure can it.
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Old 09-08-2008, 04:00 AM   #15
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Good for you Spinner. We want to hear adventures in your life. I like to hear about these things. Congrats on winning your ribbon.

I agree the fat has to do with sealing, rather than with spoilage. If the jar is sealed then it is sealed and no air can go in. No air, no spoilage.

Oh, and yes to the sausages. They need to be made into patties and fried first then stacked in the jar and processed. You could make broth from the pan drippings or use hot water. I have it somewhere in one of my old canning books that are not Blue Ball Book approved.

When folks had no way to freeze meats they used fat to store the cooked meats in. That is if they didn't salt their foods. Salt cost money though and hopefully the animal they butchered had enough of it's own fat to use. All meat was cooked a lot. All meat was well done. On the farm you ate meat in the winter, greens in the spring.

Watch out I am starting to ramble.
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Old 09-08-2008, 08:58 AM   #16
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Thanks, Sarrah! Years ago, I canned quite a bit, then stopped for about 20 years. When I started again, I found ever so many things had changed. So I ended up making a new friend of the home economics agent because I called with questions so often. When time for the county fair rolled around, she called and asked me to enter a jar of everything DH and I had put by. Used to be a lot of interest in that but over time, interest had flagged and not too many folks even entered the canning competition. Since she had been such a big help to me, I felt bad about turning her down. So we entered about 8 or 9 things, with no hope at all of winning anything. To our total astonishment, we won ribbons on all but one thing!

There was a lot of competition, but too many people were still using the old ways that had been proven unsafe, and/or dangerous and destroyed nutritional value of the food. But I'd taken time to learn and do it right.

Used to be that green beans were canned by boiling for THREE HOURS in a water bath canner. And were still doing it that way because it's the way they always had done it. To enter the competition, you have to follow the guidelines in the Blue Book. (Ball sponsors the competition, so I'm sure the two things are connected.) And the chance of botulism was much higher, too. A pressure canner gets to a higher heat way faster, making pressure canned green beans much safer to eat.

Well, now I'm rambling. Must be catching, Sarrah! ROFLOL (my smilies aren't working - I know not why...)
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Old 09-08-2008, 09:28 AM   #17
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There are still folks out there doing things like boiling water bath canning green beans even though the recommendations from the USDA and the various cooperative extension services have been to steam pressure can them for over sixty years now. Lots of folks who "do it that way because it's the way my mama or grandmama always did it."

There are also plenty of folks who preserve foods according to a set of directions or other who have no understanding at all of why things are done the way they are. I run into this rather frequently.

.....Alan.
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Old 09-08-2008, 11:12 AM   #18
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Another vote here for watching for loss-leader sales of meats that can just be ground into hamburger. Local Safeway has boneless round steaks at $1.40/lb, so just yesterday I picked up 5 lb likely 93% lean ground meat for $7 or so. I figure on using a bit for burgers or whatever and pan frying the rest up, then Foodsaver vac-packing a couple of 2-lb bags for freezing.
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Old 09-08-2008, 12:53 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarrah View Post
What I have been doing at the local grocery store for ground meat Drum is. I will pick out a few on sale boneless roasts preferably with some fat on the meat. I ask the meat person if they will double grind it for me. They are always happy to do it. If they aren't busy that is. I also ask the same of pork roasts.

I then mix the two together to get a nice ground meat mixture as well as ground pork for home made sausages. That way I know the ground meat has not been mass ground in some factory somewhere in the world.
I have a kitchen aid mixer with a meat grinding attachment I use for that very reason. All these meat recalls for e. coli are from the mystery meat mass packaging places. I like knowing exactly what my burger is made from. It also makes for an extremely low chance of stray bits of nervous tissue being included that is the suspected vector in transmission of mad cow disease to humans.

My favorite for canning is a coarse grind, which is good in making chili or spaghetti sauces and casseroles. I use a bit of garlic and worcestershire sauce along with beef stock to cover the cooked meat and it gives it a nice flavor. Mine always has a fat layer on top too, and so far my burger hasn't ever tasted rancid. I generally use canned meats within 2 years though, and store them in our basement which is fairly cool all year long, so maybe they haven't had time to go rancid.
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Old 09-08-2008, 03:35 PM   #20
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Here's a question.
Can you can previously frozen hamburger, I can't see why not but wondering anyway.
I have venison from 2 years ago that I must get around to trying, it looks good , but I must admit that canned meat in glass jars looks pretty "funky".
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Old 09-08-2008, 03:43 PM   #21
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Yes, you may can previously frozen meat. I've done it many times.

.....Alan.
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