Go Back   This Blue Marble, a Global Current Events Discussion Forum > Health and Medicine > Medical News

Medical News News, information and discussions about health issues, medicine and biotechnology.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 02-08-2009, 12:12 PM   #1
Mousehound
Senior Level 6
 
Mousehound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 8,434
Thanks: 1,542
Thanked 788 Times in 501 Posts
Default Younger Men With Erectile Dysfunction At Double Risk Of Heart Disease

ScienceDaily (Feb. 8, 2009) — Men who experience erectile dysfunction between the ages of 40 and 49 are twice as likely to develop heart disease than men without dysfunction, according to a new Mayo Clinic study. Researchers also found that men with erectile dysfunction have an 80 percent higher risk of heart disease.

"The highest risk for coronary heart disease was in younger men," says researcher Jennifer St. Sauver, Ph.D. The study was published in the February 2009 issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The results suggest that younger men and their doctors may need to consider erectile dysfunction a harbinger of future risk of coronary heart disease -- and take appropriate steps to prevent it, says Dr. St. Sauver.


"The importance of the study cannot be overstated," writes Martin Miner, M.D., in an editorial in the same issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. The results "raise the possibility of a 'window of curability,' in which progression of cardiac disease might be slowed or halted by medical intervention," writes Dr. Miner, who practices at the Men's Health Center, Miriam Hospital, Providence, R.I.

Erectile dysfunction is common, and prevalence increases with age. It affects 5 to 10 percent of men at age 40. By age 70, from 40 to 60 percent of men have the condition.

Dr. St. Sauver says researchers wanted to learn more about the connections between age, cardiovascular disease and erectile dysfunction. Two previous studies, both published in 2005, laid groundwork for the Mayo Clinic study. One found that erectile dysfunction predicted an increased risk of heart disease, but the erectile dysfunction of the study participants was not assessed with an externally validated questionnaire and cardiac events were not subjected to standardized review for diagnostic accuracy [Thompson et al, JAMA, 2005]. The second predicted that future cardiovascular disease would be higher in younger men with erectile dysfunction, but wasn't able to follow the men to determine if heart disease developed [Ponholzer et al, Eur Urol, 2005].

For the Mayo Clinic study, the investigators identified 1,402 men who lived in Olmsted County, Minn., in 1996 and did not have heart disease. Every two years for 10 years, these men were assessed for urological and sexual health.

Answers to questions from the Brief Male Sexual Function Inventory, a statistically validated questionnaire, were used to determine erectile dysfunction. The baseline prevalence of erectile dysfunction in study participants was: 2.4 percent in men aged 40-49; 5.6 percent in men aged 50-59; 17 percent in men aged 60-69 and 38.8 percent in men 70 years and older. Those initial data and the increasing incidence of erectile dysfunction over time were linked to data from a long-term study of heart disease in Olmsted County residents, led by Veronique Roger, M.D., Mayo Clinic cardiologist.

Over 10 years of follow-up, researchers found that men with erectile dysfunction were 80 percent more likely to develop coronary heart disease compared to men without erectile dysfunction. The highest risk of new heart disease was seen in the youngest study participants who had erectile dysfunction. In men 40 to 49 years old when the study began, the number of new cases in men with erectile dysfunction was more than 50-fold higher than in men without erectile dysfunction. Statistically, that's a cumulative incidence of 48.52 per 1,000 person years in those with erectile dysfunction compared to 0.94 per 1,000 person years in those without erectile dysfunction).

In men in their 50s, 60s and 70s, the total incidence of new cases of heart disease also was higher in those with erectile dysfunction. However, the differences were not as striking as those seen among the 40- to 49-year- olds.

"In older men, erectile dysfunction may be of less prognostic importance for development of future heart disease," says Dr. St. Sauver.

This study did not determine reasons for the increased risk of heart disease among men with erectile dysfunction. Some have theorized that erectile dysfunction and coronary artery disease may be different manifestations of the same underlying disease process. A buildup of plaque that can block arteries around the heart may plug the smaller penile arteries first, causing erectile dysfunction. Alternatively, arteries may lose elasticity over time, contributing to heart disease. This arterial stiffening may affect the smaller penile arteries first.


http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0202113601.htm
__________________
There are always dozens of reasons why something "can't" be done. That's no excuse in my book. If you want it bad enough, you find a way. That's how life works for grown ups. -- Booger

Don't be afraid to be open-minded. Your brain won't fall out.
Mousehound is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-08-2009, 12:58 PM   #2
sandyd
Beach Fun
 
sandyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: SoCal
Posts: 6,874
Thanks: 382
Thanked 231 Times in 190 Posts
I wonder if the did testosterone levels. I've heard a few anti-aging/hormone replacement docs say low levels are first, then ED, then other systems Cardiac because testosterone has a big effect on muscles.
__________________
"The danger is not that a particular class is unfit to govern: every class is unfit to govern." Lord Acton

The only way to win is to not play...(like global thermal nuclear war).
sandyd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-14-2009, 04:36 PM   #3
Mousehound
Senior Level 6
 
Mousehound's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Germany
Posts: 8,434
Thanks: 1,542
Thanked 788 Times in 501 Posts
Default Talking And Treating Erectile Dysfunction

Non-stop commercials convey help in the bedroom is just a prescription away. And while some 35 million men in this country have found a renewed sex life thanks to the “little blue pill,” Temple urologist Jack Mydlo says men can improve their performance without a visit to the doctor or a drugstore.

“The last thing I want them to do is take a pill and jump in bed because a certain part of the mechanism for erections is psychological. They have to be in the right mood, with the right person and take care of themselves” said Mydlo, MD, professor and chair of the department of urology at the School of Medicine.

Surprisingly, a good percentage of men who seek medical help aren’t even in a relationship.

“About thirty percent of the men who have a penile prosthesis don’t even have a partner,” said Mydlo. “They’re putting the cart before the horse, so to speak, and think they’ll get a partner once they have the implant.

Instead, Mydlo offers simple tips this Valentine’s Day to turn a man’s potency from terrible to terrific.

Stop smoking

Diabetes and high blood pressure restrict blood flow to the penis, leading to erectile dysfunction. But if you can rule those conditions out as causes of ED, the next culprit in line is cigarettes. “The number one thing we can do to stop erectile dysfunction is to stop smoking. It’s the number one environmental cause of ED in our society,” says Mydlo. Again, smoking restricts blood flow. The catch? Don’t expect better erections the minute you stop lighting up. He says it takes 12 to 24 months for better function once you quit the habit.

Control cholesterol

Cholesterol is a trigger of sorts for ED. “Men with a cholesterol level of 240 or higher have almost a twofold increase of ED compared to a man who has lower cholesterol numbers,” says Mydlo. That’s because high levels of cholesterol lead to plaque buildup in tubes (corpa cavernosa) in the penis and arteries, which can greatly reduce blood flow. And no blood flow means no erection. So start exercising and check with your doctor about cholesterol-lowering medications.

Cut back on fat

Obesity is to blame not only for men with self-esteem issues involving their appearance, but also their performance. “Adipose tissue in body fat converts testosterone to estrogen, and lower levels of testosterone can make it difficult for a man to achieve an erection, no matter how many pills they take,” says Mydlo. Losing weight will improve the testosterone to estrogen ratio, which may improve sex drive, or libido, as well as erections. It also decreases cholesterol, which will help improve blood flow.

For some of the 18 million men who have erectile dysfunction, these three tips may do the trick. For others, Mydlo suggests a visit to a urologist to go over options, ranging from pumps to implants to pills, like Viagra®, Cialis®,and Levitra.® There is one factor, though, that Mydlo can’t help with but Cupid probably can: finding the right mate.

“They believe if they don’t have good sexual function, who is going to want them? But the truth is, if you don’t have a mental connection with your partner, everything will be for naught.”


Full article:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...0204172216.htm
__________________
There are always dozens of reasons why something "can't" be done. That's no excuse in my book. If you want it bad enough, you find a way. That's how life works for grown ups. -- Booger

Don't be afraid to be open-minded. Your brain won't fall out.
Mousehound is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
disease, double, dysfunction, erectile, heart, men, risk, younger

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin®
Copyright © Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.