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Old 01-12-2009, 11:26 PM   #1
rryan
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Default Oilcloth/waxed canvas sources?

Anybody know where I can find real, heavy oilcloth as in oiled or waxed canvas?
I've searched a bit and everything seems kind of lightweight or looks like a tablecloth.

I want to have the saddle maker up the road make me some sleeping bags/bedrolls I can line with wool blankets or stuff a sleeping bag into and large pieces would be good to keep the number of seams to a minimum.
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Old 01-12-2009, 11:44 PM   #2
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I don't know much about oilcloth except that it's not completely waterproof. If you're not completely set on using that for the purpose, I suggest going to REI.com and ordering a goretex bivy sack and a synthetic sleeping bag rated to maybe 20 below the lowest temp in your area.

Oh, there's an ad running at Amazon for a nested system ..... hold on a moment while I go fetch it.

Here it is, it's unavailable now but you could look around for something similar: Amazon.com: 3 - in - 1 Military - style Sleeping...&


It doesn't want to link, but it's from Guide Gear:

Product Description
U.S. Military - style ECWS 3 - in - 1 Sleeping System. 3 comfy layers! Patterned after the famous U.S. Military ECWS (Extreme Cold Weather System). Use each Bag alone or snap 'em together for amazing warmth. 1. Intermediate Sleeping Bag: Can be used with one or both of the other Bags; Drawstring hood; 2 1/2 lbs. of Hollofil; Super tough 190T rip-stop fabric; Measures 34 x 81 x 24"; All 3 Bags together earn a -10 degree F comfort rating Black. 2. Patrol Sleeping Bag: 1 1/2 lbs. Hollo fiber; 190T rip-stop fabric with a water-resistant coating; Large nylon zipper and baffle; Drawstring hood; Measures 81 x 34 x 24"; Comfort rated +30-50 degrees F; Bronze green. 3. Outer Shell Bivy Bag: Waterproof, taped and breathable material; Fully encloses your body with Velcro closure at top Hooded; Camo. Order right away for comfort in the icy cold! 3-in-1 Military-style Sleeping System
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Old 01-12-2009, 11:55 PM   #3
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Try Tyvek.........
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Old 01-13-2009, 12:17 AM   #4
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I think I know what your looking for, rryan. DH has a cattleman's duster (coat) that's made from heavy, brown waxed duck cloth, so the fabric must be available somewhere. I'll look around the net for it.
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Old 01-13-2009, 07:06 AM   #5
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Filson makes clothing with it so must have a source of the fabric. It's paraffin coated usually, not oil.

http://www.filson.com/home/index.jsp
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Old 01-13-2009, 08:43 AM   #6
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Just one hint..Never wash coats or anything that's made of oil cloth in typical washer-dryer. My Son had one of those coats and I put it in there to wash.(took awhile to get the washer clean after that dumb mistake)..And the Coat was worthless after...What a mess
P.S. My family had several Oil cloth Tablecloths when I was a kid and they are actually quite thick, not flimsy as you would think. I priced some a few years ago from France and they aren't cheap anymore.

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Old 01-13-2009, 10:16 AM   #7
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I was thinking along the lines of my Filson Tin Cloth coat.

Most anything will not hold up out here---I live in the land of junipers, sagebrush, prickly pears, unidentified mutant thorn bushes, and sharp rocks.

The one time I had to throw a sleeping bag directly on the ground it was shredded by morning.

My tin cloth coat is plenty waterproof for here.
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Old 01-13-2009, 11:32 AM   #8
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I wonder how hard it would be to make... get the grade canvas you're after, have the bags made, then soak in melted paraffin? No, that would be a mess... gonna go a googling when I get a break now that you've got me curious about it
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Old 01-13-2009, 11:32 AM   #9
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We live in pretty rugged country, too, and DH puts down horse blankets if he has to sleep directly on the ground in his sleeping bag. They're incredibly durable but not waterproof, of course.
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Old 01-13-2009, 01:23 PM   #10
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Tyvek is pretty waterproof and puncture resistant. Campers and backpackers are using it for groundcloths and bivy bags. Campmor is offering grommeted Tyvek groundcloths.

Google "Tyvek ground cloths" for vast amounts of information. Typar is even thicker, but hard to find.
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Old 01-13-2009, 01:33 PM   #11
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Several years ago I had an Arabian mare and she hated the cold. I bought her a New Zealand rug and it was great - warm, weather proof and tough. It sounds like what you are looking for, it could be remade to suit your purpose. They are made of waxed canvas with a wool liner. You can find a lot about them if you do a google search. Here is one, it looks different than mine but I bought mine about 25 years ago. If there is a tack shop near you, you could ask if they could order one for you. Mine was green.

http://www.highcountrysaddles.com/itm00138.htm
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Old 01-13-2009, 01:47 PM   #12
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DIY = PITA according to my research. I think my Google-Fu was pretty good in finding this link for a fabric source though!!

http://www.waxwear.com/home.html
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Old 01-13-2009, 01:50 PM   #13
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Here's some DIY on upkeep and refinishing....

http://www.woodcentral.com/cgi-bin/r...cles_368.shtml
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Old 01-13-2009, 01:52 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rryan View Post
I was thinking along the lines of my Filson Tin Cloth coat.

Most anything will not hold up out here---I live in the land of junipers, sagebrush, prickly pears, unidentified mutant thorn bushes, and sharp rocks.

The one time I had to throw a sleeping bag directly on the ground it was shredded by morning.

My tin cloth coat is plenty waterproof for here.
Another possibility would be what they often used in the old days, a piece of leather.

Buffalo skin if you have a pack animal to carry the weight, and if it gets very cold.
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Old 01-13-2009, 02:20 PM   #15
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Good info --thanks all o fyou.

Yeah, a buffalo skin would be great except for the weight issue. If i break down 8 hours walk from anywhere (I have) it would be nice to be able to carry something so I could stop and actually rest instead of trying to hug a tiny greasewood fire for hours.
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Old 01-15-2009, 12:00 PM   #16
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I got a 16 ft. tarp made out of VERY heavy oiled canvas at Northern Tool. I cover my trailer with it now, and it would make a good makeshift tent, awning, etc. Eyelets are good on it, heavy-duty. They had several sizes, I'm tempted to get more in smaller sizes, like maybe some 8x10's.

Shipping is going to cost you a LOT on the fabric. You might check these out if you're close to a store.

Cons: Not 100% waterproof, pretty heavy.
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Old 01-15-2009, 06:19 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ladybugs4me View Post
I think I know what your looking for, rryan. DH has a cattleman's duster (coat) that's made from heavy, brown waxed duck cloth, so the fabric must be available somewhere. I'll look around the net for it.
I have one also. They make good motorcycle jackets.

As someone said, you can't clean it the regular way.

I just hose it down and let it dry. No soap.
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Old 01-16-2009, 12:11 PM   #18
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It's been my experience that waxed duck cloth/canvas doesn't breath very well. One of the reasons it works as a motorcycle jacket is because it is wind proof/doesn't breath. Sleeping under it is not a pleasant experience.

With the advent of Ripstop and Cordura nylon, along with Gortex and the knockoff, waterproof/windproof/breathable membranes, modern outdoor gear is miles ahead of the old generation of gear.

Modern outdoor gear has been tested in all climates and areas of the world. From the north to the south poles. From Death Valley to Mt. Everest and back again. Even Wyoming. It's good stuff. You just need to know what you are buying.

That's not to say that wool and canvas don't have their place, especially if you're looking for that old west feel. But if it's pure performance that you're looking for, synthetics are the way to go.
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Old 01-16-2009, 12:16 PM   #19
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That's not to say that wool and canvas don't have their place, especially if you're looking for that old west feel. But if it's pure performance that you're looking for, synthetics are the way to go.
For outdoor rec they are fine, but for outdoor labor not so much. The synthetics just aren't tough enough for it.
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Old 01-16-2009, 12:26 PM   #20
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On that point we'll have to agree to disagree. No one labors harder than mountaineers or labors under tougher conditions. They all use synthetics. Their lives depend on their gear. Literally.
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Old 01-16-2009, 12:49 PM   #21
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I think the difference is getting down in it ya know...filthy. Bar oil, gas, mud, duff, briars, tops, slash, branches....horsing equipment and wood around, etc. etc. There's more strength in the tin cloth/treated canvas type fabrics favored by woods workers than in the thinner synthetics. Also more resistance to degradation via dirty conditions KWIM?
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Old 01-16-2009, 02:07 PM   #22
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I think the difference is getting down in it ya know...filthy. Bar oil, gas, mud, duff, briars, tops, slash, branches....horsing equipment and wood around, etc. etc. There's more strength in the tin cloth/treated canvas type fabrics favored by woods workers than in the thinner synthetics. Also more resistance to degradation via dirty conditions KWIM?
Yep---plus barbed wire resistance.

My tin cloth coat is my suit of armor--If I am out riding in rough country fast i wear it even in the heat as I know it will absorb a huge amount of damage instead of my hide. I think the double layers would stop a 22LR at 100 yds.

Synthetics are great---my boots have gore tex and thinsulate which I love but some of these old materials have their place---just as there is NOTHING i have ever found better than wool for keeping warm.
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Old 01-16-2009, 02:39 PM   #23
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On that point we'll have to agree to disagree. No one labors harder than mountaineers or labors under tougher conditions. They all use synthetics. Their lives depend on their gear. Literally.
Goretex/polartech/polypro liners are much better for living in cold weather, up to a point. The goretex and knockoffs are easily punctured, slashed, or melted by embers from your campfire. The goretex loses waterproof breathability (one or the other) if you're out there for some weeks without cleaning it.

If all that's needed is a short-term solution for getting back home (say no more than a couple of weeks, I'd say go with a goretex bivy sack and nested sleeping bags as in my earlier post, plus a little repair kit. You shouldn't have a campfire with it, unless you are upwind and it doesn't spark much (it probably won't in dry conditions.) You wouldn't actually need a campfire if you have good enough insulation, even though they're very comforting when you're alone.

This would be far lighter than other materials, easily carried.

For longterm apocalyptic purposes you would want some combination of leather and wool used as a bedroll or simply worn as clothing, both of them being more durable than just about anything if they're of high quality. Put them in storage and don't bother with them unless the synthetics are too worn to be useful anymore.
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Old 01-16-2009, 09:47 PM   #24
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I want to have the saddle maker up the road make me some sleeping bags/bedrolls...
The guy's just looking for a bedroll. I've slept under waxed canvas and it wasn't very comfortable so I figured I'd mention it.

I have a Gortex and nylon bivy sack that I've been using for the past eight years. It works great and is still in fine condition.

It sounds like you're sold on canvas. You might try a tent maker. The canvas wall tents I've seen are pretty durable.
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Old 07-30-2009, 01:45 AM   #25
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On that point we'll have to agree to disagree. No one labors harder than mountaineers or labors under tougher conditions. They all use synthetics. Their lives depend on their gear. Literally.
i can agree to that partially. i am a "mountain man" i pack on horseback and on foot into the mountains for 75 days a year. i'm gearing up for this fall, but i think i'm going to have to stay away from the synthetics this time, last year was aweful thanks to "qualofill". it just doesn't work well in alaska or wyoming. i'm leaning towards making an oilcloth bedroll to use with homemade wool liners. for the horseback part of the season, weight isn't an issue for me if it's under 20 pounds.

my next project might be waxed cotton, it won't smell like linseed oil will in the oil cloth.
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