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Old 12-20-2015, 03:51 PM   #26
Catbird
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ross View Post
What a very different world you guys live in and what a lot of
interesting ideas .

IMO if you cannot leave home one of the most important items to
have is refrigeration able to operate independently of your normal
energy supplier . People seem to forget how important refrigeration
is to food security .

..
Pack a lunch...

I'm not sure that we live in such a different world, but we might have very different ideas about what surviving in our world we be like if TSHTF. (Except for Sourdough because FB is correct in what she wrote about life in Alaska.)

Depending on how TSHTF (EMP, pandemic, civil unrest, terrorist attack, dirty bomb, nuclear exchange, etc.), life in a large city or a nearby suburb, like where my son currently lives, is going to be dangerous and, for most people, not sustainable for any extended time. Most people don't realize that America runs largely on trucks. They deliver almost all goods that a population in a suburban environment needs - food, fuel, and medicine, to name just a few things. That supply and distribution system is likely to come to a screeching halt. In most cases, unless a suburban group can quickly form a cooperative and secure environment in their neighborhood, it's unlikely they could raise enough food to live on, even more so if TSHTF in the winter. Harvesting and storing the food will also be challenging. And of course, those who have not are very likely to go after those who do have.

I'm not saying it's impossible. There is a small but growing trend toward suburban homesteading and there's a lot of great ways to make that work. But it requires an investment of time, money and commitment that most people don't have or choose not to spend. In the case of my son, our goal has been two-fold. First is to get him to a point where he has sufficient food and other equipment to shelter in place for 6 months if necessary. It's been a slow process because he literally started with nothing but an empty house. So I'd say that we're about half-way to that goal. The other goal has been to make it possible for him to get to our place, whether by car or, if necessary, on foot.

Prior to our living where we do now, we lived in the house where DH's mom grew up, in a very small town about 40 miles from here. It was nice but there was no way we could live there for long after a SHTF event. So when we had sufficient savings and went looking for another place to live, the potential for creating a place where we could reasonably live post-event was pretty high on our list of "must have". We now have 10 acres of mixed land - some cleared, some wooded. We're a little over 1/4 mile from a large lake. We've been slowly collecting plastic tanks which we can fill with suitably filtered lake water, until we can spend the money to sink our own well. This coming year, we hope to invest some money in a rain-water collection & distribution system. We also have a run off/overflow ditch that was put in place years ago in case of flooding which we can easily extend to reach the lake, if needed. At some point, that can also be routed through a small building to use as a version of a spring house for cool storage. We have an orchard, berry patch, small vineyard, and a large garden which can easily be increased. We keep an extensive seed bank, which we rotate, that we can use to plant both food and non-food crops for trade. We don't keep any livestock just yet, but if needed, we can support poultry, a cow and a couple of mules nad we have sources for them already set up. Our greatest lacks are power sources and fuel storage. We have plans for alternative power sources but they're a little ways down the priority/budget list. And for now, we've decided that trying to safely store and rotate any significant amount of fuel is beyond our capabilities.

Instead, we plan to barter for it. Because we live in such a rural area, there are a lot of farms and ranches that do store large amounts of fuel. We know several of those folks and are comfortable in the knowledge that they'd be willing to deal with us. And that brings up what is probably the most important part of our preparations - we have a strong network of friends and acquaintances in the area whom we trust (at least to some extent) and know that are willing to barter with us. We already do that to some extent anyways. It helps that DH and the IL's are at least distantly related to about half of the people around here, and that DH knows a lot of people because of his job. The IL's also have a strong network through their church community. So we have sources for many of the things that we'd need and we have a number of things to barter with. DH's little honey hobby will be a gold mine and we have the supplies to increase the number of hives he keeps. We also have an extensive collection of food preservation equipment, supplies and knowledge. And between us, we have a wide variety of skills. My FIL is an expert woodworker and can build just about anything. DH is an engineer and can McGyver all kinds of stuff. My MIL is a retired nurse and I have some medical training and experience and we have a good selection of equipment. She and I both sew and we're working on restoring an old treadle-powered sewing machine that I got for free. As for me, I have a oddly varied skill set as a result of a gypsy-like work and life history.

But still, the hardest part will be getting DS and grandson down here, which is why we're working on several alternative ways to do that. It's really not that far, only about 300 miles or so. I say "only" because until a few years ago he was living in Texas and then Cali, which would have made his trip more like 1300 miles. His deployments to the sandbox, and his experiences there, have given him the skills and knowledge needed to make the trip. Our job is to help to provide him with the tools he'll need to reach our little haven.

There are other aspects of our preps that I've not mentioned here, but even with those, we aren't fully prepared for all possibilities. I doubt that it's even possible to cover all eventualities. So there's always work to be done, but we're well on our way. We've worked hard to create a family haven and my son recognizes the importance of what we're doing. As his situation improves, he plans to contribute time and money to the ongoing process of making this place as self-sufficient as possible. He will inherit this property when DH and I are dead, and assures me that he has no desire or intent to sell it. Instead, he wants to keep it and add to it for as long as he can. I'm thankful for that. Knowing that this place will exist for DS and his family, and the next generation, gives me great peace of mind.
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Old 12-20-2015, 04:58 PM   #27
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One of the things that "Prepper'people" don't give enough thought to is fire. With no firefighters, no fuel for the fire engines or portable pumps, no water pressure in the city or town.

Entire cities, entire towns, even entire states could burn to total destruction.

I think more humans died in the firebombing of Tokyo than died in both nuclear bombs in Japan. Think about the "Great Chicago fire" or "The Great San Francisco fire" if it happened today with no water.

Millions of humans trying to escape a city with "NO" transportation, all on foot, and fire moving at 30 miles per hour. Horrific.

I live in a National Forest, so I have canoes cached, and supplies cached across bodies of water, in the event of forest fire. Still, my biggest risk is SHTF at this time of year, three months of dark and cold. I once spent six months alone, with no human contact, but I was 40'some years younger then.

I am just guessing that in most areas of America, that with thousands of humans moving to, and camping in the nearest park, forest, wilderness, it will not be long before there are many wildfires everywhere.
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Old 12-21-2015, 04:39 PM   #28
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Caching is pretty useless without some anti electronic measures.

I know the ABC's wont be the first, well let me take that back, some national park authority might be interested today on off track activities.

But generally your account is hackable easy enough if someone knew you had some preps all they need to do is log in as you.


https://www.google.com/maps/timeline
This one is educational to you and only you + NSA of your activities.

Run across this online, friendview, not that much into code but i suspect the below coded link gives access to someone bloging at

Code:
http://techcrunch.com/2013/12/18/google-location-history/

way 2 much data of your cache locations, user 1209600&hl ? or anyone geting you to hit the wrong link got your catche.

https://accounts.google.com/ServiceLogin?service=friendview&passive=1209600&hl=en&gl=us&continue=https://www.google.com/maps/timeline#identifier
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Old 12-21-2015, 04:55 PM   #29
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Helps you find where your friends are, allows parents to keep tabs on their children, could possibly help you locate some places

http://zachf14.wikispaces.com/file/v...s+Research.doc
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Old 12-22-2015, 12:41 AM   #30
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I have a little experience with refrigeration using non-electrical appliances when I lived in Africa.

A deep freexzer on petroleum burner wasn't working for days, we tried everything, and suddenly everything was frozen block solid

Likewise, a little fridge that could work on the mains, on 12 volts car battery and gas was pretty useful on safari, but only by using propane gas. The 12 volt option would drain the car battery even when driving and with gas it was OK but only if the fridge was perfectly level (I always took one of those builder level tools with me, the one with the fluid and the air bubble in the middle )

A huge Coleman ice box filled with a solid block of ice could last for a week, that was an excellent option to keep the beer cold, to be replaced by the fish we caught.
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Old 12-22-2015, 02:03 AM   #31
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Caution ADVISED: Be sure fish have gone to fish heaven, the bastards have been known to drink all the beer, and shamelessly urinate in the cooler. Don't ask how I know this........


Quote:
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A huge Coleman ice box filled with a solid block of ice could last for a week, that was an excellent option to keep the beer cold, to be replaced by the fish we caught.
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