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Old 11-27-2016, 05:55 PM   #1
Potemkin
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Default Side job for knitters

Meet WOOLN, the fashion company that hires grandmas to do its knitting

This company strives to put the skills of senior citizens to good use, while creating a beautiful, high-quality product.

A new fashion startup in New York City has hired an unusual workforce to produce its beautiful hand-knitted accessories. WOOLN relies entirely on the skill of nine middle- to elderly-aged women, all retirees and New York residents who are also skilled knitters.

WOOLN was founded by two French moms living in the U.S., Faustine Badrichani and Margaux Rousseau. They have understood shoppers’ desire for a more personal, traceable, and socially ethical shopping experience, and came up with this innovative idea.

More http://www.treehugger.com/sustainabl...-knitting.html
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Old 11-27-2016, 10:05 PM   #2
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It's a good start, but WOOLN has only 9 knitters working for them. I would love to see more companies employ crafters in cottage industries.
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Old 11-27-2016, 10:10 PM   #3
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It's a perfect job to do from your home.
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Old 11-27-2016, 10:24 PM   #4
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It is that. plus, individual knitters can decide how little or a lot of work they want to or can do, depending on health & financial need.
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Old 11-27-2016, 10:46 PM   #5
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There are very few crafts made in western countries that can compete with third world manufactured goods. A few years back I tried to assemble a collection, or sampling, of traditionally made regional knitwear. I found many items, like Irish fisherman knit sweaters and Cowichan sweaters, are often jobbed out to machine knitters in Eastern Europe and Asia. The reason is simple. Cost of materials x minimum hourly wage to make the item often results in an astronomical price.

There are some exceptions, mostly thanks to labeling laws. For example, to be sold as "Harris Tweed" the wool must be dyed and woven into fabric by islanders in their own homes in the Outer Hebrides. As knitting resurfaces as a hobby and people become more aware of the cost and skills involved in production, they're demanding authenticity. So hopefully there will be a greater demand before handmade knitwear goes the way of handmade lace.
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Old 11-27-2016, 11:23 PM   #6
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As long as there are people who appreciate the craftsmanship AND who have the money to spend, 'handmade' & specifically labelled items will remain with us.

I hope.
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Old 11-27-2016, 11:42 PM   #7
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Oh, hell, Mom and I could barely afford the materials for high quality sweaters when we knit them ourselves back in the 80s. I remember one of my Nordic-style sweater's materials totalled about $70 in 1983. Pay someone to knit it by hand in N. America? These must be pricey items.
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