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Old 10-23-2008, 09:27 AM   #1
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Default The Miracle Tree

Beating the drum for the Moringa tree!

The Moringa tree provides 7 times the Vitamin C in oranges, 4 times the calcium in milk, 4 times the Vitamin A in carrots, 2 times the protein in milk, and 3 times the potassium in bananas



THE MORINGA TREE, MORINGA OLEIFERA, IS CALLED MOTHER'S BEST FRIEND. That is one way they sometimes refer to this tree in the Philippines where the leaves of the malunggay, as they call it, are cooked and fed to babies. Other names for it include horseradish tree and drumstick tree (India) and benzolive (Haiti).

Moringa tree leaves, pods, and roots are eaten; flowers are loved by bees; and seeds are powdered and used to purify water from murky rivers.

The leaflets can be stripped from the feathery, fern-like leaves and used in any spinach recipe. Small trees can be pulled up after a few months and the taproot ground, mixed with vinegar and salt and used in place of horseradish. Very young plants can be used as a tender vegetable. After about 8 months the tree begins to flower and continues year round. The flowers can be eaten or used to make a tea. They are also good for beekeepers. The young pods can be cooked and have a taste reminiscent of asparagus. The green peas and surrounding white material can be removed from larger pods and cooked in various ways. Seeds from mature pods (which can be 2 feet long) can be browned in a skillet, mashed and placed in boiling water, which causes an excellent cooking or lubricating oil to float to the surface. The oil reportedly does not become rancid. The wood is very, very soft, though the tree is a good living fencepost. It makes acceptable firewood but poor charcoal.



There is more good news. The edible parts are exceptionally nutritious! Frank Martin says in Survival and Subsistence in the Tropics that "among the leafy vegetables, one stands out as particularly good, the horseradish tree. The leaves are outstanding as a source of vitamin A and, when raw, vitamin C. They are a good source of B vitamins and among the best plant sources of minerals. The calcium content is very high for a plant. Phosphorous is low, as it should be. The content of iron is very good (it is reportedly prescribed for anemia in the Philippines). They are an excellent source of protein and a very low source of fat and carbohydrates. Thus the leaves are one of the best plant foods that can be found." In his Edible Leaves of the Tropics he adds that the leaves are incomparable as a source of the sulfur-containing amino acids methionine and cystine, which are often in short supply.


USE AS AN ANTIBIOTIC. A study at University of San Carlos in Guatemala is summarized. Herbal applications are commonly used to treat skin infections in developing countries, although few investigations are conducted to validate scientifically their popular use. A previous study had showed that moringa seeds are effective against skin infecting bacteria Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro (i. e. in a test tube). This study showed that mice infected with S. aureus recovered as quickly with a specially prepared aqueous extract of moringa seed as with the antibiotic neomycin.

This study proves only the effectiveness of moringa as they prepared it. That preparation could be done in any country, but not with just household utensils. It was prepared by infusing 10 g powdered moringa seeds in 100 ml of 45 deg.C water for 2 hours. The part that is a bit more complicated is reducing the 100 ml down to 10 ml by placing it in a rotavaporator. This is a very common piece of laboratory equipment which continually rotates a flask containing the liquid. An aspirator attached to a faucet produces a modest vacuum when the water is turned on. A rubber tube from the aspirator is connected to the rotavaporator, reducing the pressure and causing the water to evaporate rather quickly without boiling it. The ointment was prepared by placing 10% of the extract in vaseline. (We can send a copy of the article to medical personnel.)

Are you in a situation where there is a shortage of antibiotics? This ointment could be prepared for use in the local community wherever there is electricity and running water. Simpler methods, better suited to preparation as needed in the home, might also be effective. I hope someone will devise and test such preparations.http://enviro.org.au/article_moringaTree.asp

Food, Bio diesel, Stock food, Medicine, The uses are endless, there is also much research underway into the anti tumor and hypertension uses of this tree,
Quote:
Scientific studies conducted in major universities throughout the world support the efficacy of the use of Moringa oleifera, Nebedaye, for treating the following conditions and dysfunctions: {Numbered references follow}

Anti-diarrhea: 1, 11, 20, 23

Anti-inflammatory: 1, 7, 11, 20, 21

Anti-microbial: 1, 9, 21

Anti-spasmodic: 11, 14, 15, 16

Birth Control: 1, 2, 15, 21

Blindness: 23

Candidiasis: (Thrush): 9, 23

Cancer: 1, 10, 21

Chronic Fatigue (Epstein-Barr virus): 1, 17

Diabetes: 12. 21, 23

Diuretic: 1, 11, 12, 20, 23

Epilepsy: 1, 23

Epstein-Barr virus: 1, 17

Gastrointestinal motility: 1, 15

Hepatitis: 4, 5

HIV-AIDS: 3, 6 See also studies AP

Hypertension: 1, 8, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, 20, 21

Lupus: 7

Malnutrition: 18, 23 See also studies A P

Prostate Enlargement, Prostate Cancer: 24, See also studies M P

Rheumatism 1, 7

Tumors: 1, 10, 21, 23

Ulcers (Gastric & Skin): 1, 23

Water Purification: 22, 23
http://www.northscaleinstitute.com/s...ga_Science.htm

The suprises just keep coming with this tree.
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Old 10-23-2008, 10:34 AM   #2
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So...where does one buy one or two to grow?
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Old 10-23-2008, 11:44 AM   #3
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Wow! Great article.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moringa_oleifera
The Moringa tree grows mainly in semi-arid tropical and subtropical areas, corresponding in the United States to USDA hardiness zones 9 and 10. While it grows best in dry sandy soil, it tolerates poor soil, including coastal areas. It is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
"The tree is said to host ghosts during the night. This combined with the fact that the tree attracts a host of insects make it unattractive for people to grow it in their backyards."
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Old 10-23-2008, 11:53 AM   #4
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Wouldn't you know...it's on EBay

Miracle Tree
9" Plant!


http://cgi.ebay.com/Moringa-oleifera...d=p3286.c0.m14
and in Marietta, Georgia, United States
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Old 10-23-2008, 01:17 PM   #5
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Does wild horseradish have some of the same properties? Sounds like they are in the same plant family, but wild horseradish grows will throughout America.
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Old 10-23-2008, 03:18 PM   #6
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Sounds like when Noni juice came out. I remember listening to people who told me in cured Cancer. I went and bought gallons of it for my Dad ( who had Pancreatic cancer) and it did absolutley nothing. I hope this 'New' Wonder tree actually works. One of these days someone will find the 'Right' cure, I am sure of it.
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Old 10-24-2008, 10:38 AM   #7
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http://www.drinklifein.com/ You mean like this Angelsea ? promises everything along with a nice tidy income as well. I dont know if this tree is the right one and i'll leave that up to the educated smart people to find out, I first came across this tree as a Bio Diesel source that I found I could feed to the animals on the family property and that packed a nice load of protein to boot. The more I looked the more I found out aboout the nutrion and medicinal values, and it just keeps going and going.

Quote:
Does wild horseradish have some of the same properties? Sounds like they are in the same plant family, but wild horseradish grows will throughout America.
Sorry don't know Michael, but I dont think the normal horseradish contains the the same nutritional values. (dont quote me on that tho M8)

Quote:
"The tree is said to host ghosts during the night. This combined with the fact that the tree attracts a host of insects make it unattractive for people to grow it in their backyards."
Now that's a new one, this tree just keeps on suprising, does it channel as well ?

Quote:
So...where does one buy one or two to grow?
I'm off on a 800 Km round trip tomorrow to get some seed's and cuttings Sandyd, I can send you some seed if you like.

some more info
Quote:
Here are highlights from several tables. "For a child aged 1-3, a 100 g serving of fresh cooked leaves would provide all his daily requirements of calcium, about 75% of his iron and half his protein needs, as well as important amounts of potassium, B vitamins, copper and all the essential amino acids. As little as 20 grams of leaves would provide a child with all the vitamins A and C he needs.


During pregnancy and breast-feeding, women are most at risk of suffering from nutritional
deficiencies. The table below shows the percent of the RDA of various nutrients for a nursing mother eating six rounded tablespoons (about 50 g) of leaf powder daily. It also shows the percent of the RDA for a 1-3 year old child with one rounded tablespoon of powder added to its food, three times daily.
Mother
Child
Protein
21%
42%
Calcium
84%
125%
Magnesium
54%
61%
Potassium
22%
41%
Iron
94%
71%
Vitamin A
143%
272%
Vitamin C
9%
22%
http://209.85.173.104/search?q=cache...hnotes/moringa

The potential for this tree in third world and famine struck Country's is huge, food for people, livestock, nutrition, oil, firewood and medicine along with great water purification all in the one drought hardy product is awesome.
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Old 12-03-2008, 10:29 PM   #8
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I seem to remember that "Max the Knife" grew this tree........anyone have a link?

He posted pictures of it, and how he grew it (in Arkansas/Alabama?)
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Old 12-03-2008, 11:17 PM   #9
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I'd forgotten about that. Max is in Arkansas
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Old 12-04-2008, 12:21 AM   #10
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I found a place online to order one. Here's the link if anyone is interested.

http://www.hendrycreekhideaway.com/

I have never done business with them before, but will give it a try.

I found this when googling.

Catagory 4;
On Farm Food Crops with 'Famine-Food' Components during food shortage periods.


Species Name
Moringa oleifera1

Family
Moringaceae

Local Name(s)
Aleco (Konsogna), Shiferaw (Amargna), Kalan'gi (Hamer-Bena), Ben-oil tree, cabbage tree, horse-radish tree (English)
General description
A deciduous tree to 10m, usually smaller, pale feathery foliage. M. oleifera originates from India, Arabia and was introduced to Ethiopia long ago. The tree is now naturalized in many parts of southern Ethiopia and has also been tried elsewhere with varying success. Konso people plant M. oleifera around their homesteads and also in the terraced fields.

Edible part(s), preparation methods and palatability
Leaves, tender young capsules, immature seeds, fruits and roots are edible. The young leaves are collected, cooked and eaten like other vegetables. The young roots can be collected and used as a sort of spice. But care should be taken by using the root as a food because the root bark contains poisonous alkaloids. Also the fruits are edible even though they are less important than the leaves.

Nutritional value
The leaves are said to contain important amounts of iron and other valuable nutritional elements.

Agroecology
The species originates from Northern India but it is cultivated throughout the tropics, especially in arid areas. It is a very drought resistant and valuable tree. M. oleifera requires well-drained soils with a high water table, but is drought resistant. Occurs at low altitudes in Dry and Moist Kolla agroclimatic zones (500 1,600m).

Propagation Method(s)
Direct sowing, cuttings, seedlings.

Sample location (s)
(1)Konso, (2) Humbo & (3) Bedesa (SNNPR); (4) Alduba (Hamer-Bena, South Omo)

Remarks
M. oleifera is a typical multipurpose tree species with a high economic potential. Besides its leaves' palatability, the tree produces a number of other useful products. The 'Ben-oil' from the seeds keeps its quality and so can lubricate precision machinery like watches. It is also used for salad oil, soap and cosmetics. The ground-up seeds have been successfully used in the Sudan, Burundi and Kenya to clear muddy water - a very valuable property. But leaves and the fruits are also used for medicinal purposes and livestock fodder. Furthermore the tree is used for bee forage, soil conservation, shade, windbreak, live fence, boundary marker and for fibres.
In Konso the leaves are traded on local markets in bundles offered for 10 cents each.


1Parts of the following description have been taken from Bekele-Tesemma et al., 1993: p. 316/317and Maundu et al., 1999: p. 181



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Old 05-05-2009, 06:49 AM   #11
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Ah, the Moringa tree. I need to get back to work on that project. I saved seeds from the two successful trees I was able to hatch from eggs and have never tested them to see if they're viable. If the seeds are viable, I would be happy to send some to anyone who would like to give the Moringa tree a try. They start easily and grow well in pots of garden soil. I don't know what I did wrong when I transplanted mine, but I waited till they were almost too big to haul around before transplanting them. I planted them deep, talked nice to them every day and kept them watered just like all the directions said to do. But they died before fall and that kind of derailed my project.

So anyway, I'll get to work and see what I can see. Right now, in fact.

Last edited by MaxTheKnife; 05-05-2009 at 06:59 AM.
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Old 05-10-2009, 07:10 PM   #12
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Well, five days later I have three little Moringa sprouts! Amazing, since those are viable seeds from the two trees I grew and then murdered. So that's 100% viability at this point. If anyone is serious about wanting some seeds just let me know by PM'ing me and I'll swap info with you and get some seeds on the way. It might just turn out to be a green thumb kind of year!
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Old 05-10-2009, 08:54 PM   #13
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Hi Max!
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Old 05-10-2009, 09:25 PM   #14
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Sue! It's great to see you! You're looking well.

I'll have pics of these babies as soon as they're big enough.
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Old 05-10-2009, 10:39 PM   #15
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I'm scared to get any Max. I'm pretty good at killing plants and would feel bad killing the offspring of those you killed before me


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Old 05-10-2009, 11:24 PM   #16
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I'm hoping these little ones won't remember that far back Sandyd. And I'm crossing my fingers and hoping for the best with these new ones. I'm just amazed that the first crop of seeds from those two trees are viable. Shaking my head. I catch a break once in a while, anyway.
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Old 05-14-2009, 08:30 AM   #17
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A little primer for folks who want to get started. I'll be sending out the first batch of seeds today and thought it would be a good idea to put something here about the best ways to sprout and grow the trees themselves. First, here's a link to get you all revved up about it.

http://www.hendrycreekhideaway.com/M...of%20Life.html

The way I've had the best luck sprouting the seeds is to fix a shallow dish and fill it with perlite and water. Remove the casing of the seed by gently slicing off one of the fins and cracking the casing off of the seed. Be careful not to damage the actual seed.

Start as many as you want in this dish, but remember that each seedling or pair will need to be planted in a very large pot so it can get established before transplanting. Now just push each seed down into the wet perlite until it's even with the top level of perlite. Then cover with saran wrap or plastic to form a vapor barrier and keep the breeze off of it. The seeds do best if kept in a warm (78 - 99 degree) environment. I just put them on top of my water heater and that worked like a charm. You might check the temp on top of yours before you use it. If it gets too warm it will cook the seeds instead of sprouting them.

Anyway, after they sprouts start pushing up on the plastic or saran wrap, just remove the covering and give them a bit of water each day until they reach a height of about 3". At that point, they're tough enough for handling and can be carefully planted in your waiting pot. Use a good garden soil that's nice and light and keep it moist. Mornigas just love wet feet! It should take at least 5 days for the seeds to sprout and around two weeks for them to toughen up for transplanting.

Good luck and have fun! If you live in Florida or one of the warmer states, you can transplant them into your garden and they'll live year round. If you live in a state like mine, Arkansas, the trees will die back every year and start all over each year. In a perfect world, that is. Mine died all the way and I'm just now getting around to trying again.
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Old 06-01-2009, 05:29 PM   #18
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Well, is anyone having any luck getting moringa plants started? Enquiring minds want to know.
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Old 06-01-2009, 08:36 PM   #19
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I repotted mine into a BIG pot and it seems happy. Now I just need to move it from the greenhouse to its special place on the porch. Gonna need a big man to do that for me though.
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Old 06-02-2009, 11:51 AM   #20
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I can't seem to find any info on its cold tolerance. Will it withstand any frost at all?

.....Alan.
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Old 06-03-2009, 06:56 PM   #21
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Hi Alan! If the temp drops below 40 F for any length of time the top will die back down to the ground. The tree will sprout again in the spring like many native plants if the roots are well established and safe from freezing. Under good conditions like you probably have you can expect the tree to grow up to 20 feet a year! Keep it topped off at a manageable level and it will bush up and give you lots more leaves and seed pods at a closer level to the ground. I sure hope I have better luck this year!
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Old 06-06-2009, 02:51 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaxTheKnife View Post
Hi Alan! If the temp drops below 40 F for any length of time the top will die back down to the ground. The tree will sprout again in the spring like many native plants if the roots are well established and safe from freezing.
Oh, really? I'd assumed that it would just be an annual for me but this is giving me hope otherwise if I can get it in the right spot. Cool! I'll experiment with some in pots to bring in and overwinter in the greenhouse) and some in the ground in various spots.

BTW, I planted my seeds on... looking it up... the 27th or so and I finally have a couple that popped their heads up today. Yay! So that's 10 days to first germination for anyone else starting seed.
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Old 06-06-2009, 05:38 AM   #23
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I am drooling here guys... keep up the information on your little trees for us unable to ever have a tree of our own.
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Old 07-14-2009, 11:26 PM   #24
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Mine and Beth's are seeming to keep up with each other. I think we're going to have to combine them at some point in order to keep the peace. I don't know what the sexes are, but I think mine's a male and hers is a female. Don't hold me to that but we'll see. It could be the other way around, but combining them is not an option at this point. It has to be done for best results. I'm such a romantic!
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Old 07-15-2009, 05:35 AM   #25
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My seeds never arrived max
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