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Old 07-20-2016, 10:34 PM   #1
Potemkin
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Default Bicycles

I was looking at the BBC article on the "10 Most Beautiful Bicycles".

Several of them are appropriate for this area.

http://www.bbc.com/autos/story/20140...tiful-bicycles

Pashley Parabike

**Country of origin:** UK

**Details:** Bikemaker Pashley, which has been in business since the days of King George V, is known for its classically styled, eminently English cycles – bikes with Brooks sprung saddles and ding-dong bells and big wicker baskets. Pashley's new Parabike mines British history, as well, albeit a less genteel chapter of it. The cycle recalls a WWII-era two-wheeler called the Airborne bicycle, which was carried into occupied France by British paratroopers. Pashley's version, while not designed with skydiving in mind (the original featured a folding frame that strapped to the 'trooper's body), is a classic in its own right, with a bowed multi-tube frame that is at once nostalgic and forward-thinking.

**Price:** £545 (about $900)



Donky Bike

**Country of origin:** UK

**Details:** The Donky Bike is a nontraditional beauty, to be sure, a bike that prioritises strength, simplicity and urban maneuverability over sensual lines or luxurious trappings. The cycle – which was nominated for a Design of the Year award by London's Design Museum – is BMX-inspired, with tough 20in wheels and a stocky frame bisected by a load-bearing steel beam, upon which are mounted front and rear cargo racks. It's a devoted hauler, but unlike traditional cargo bikes, which can stretch 8 feet or more end to end, the Donky is compact enough to park in the front hallway of a typical city flat.

**Price:** £499 (about $830)




World Bicycle Relief Buffalo

**Country of origin:** Angola/Kenya/South Africa/Zambia/Zimbabwe

**Details:** To many eyes, the bike you see here is, well, just a bike. But to millions of people across Africa who rely on pedal power to move themselves, their families and their goods, the Buffalo is very beautiful, indeed. The brainchild of the US-based charity World Bicycle Relief, the Buffalo is assembled by trained local workers at facilities in several African nations. From there, the bikes are donated to non-governmental organisations or sold to consumers across the continent. Its prim look, intended to recall classic British touring bikes, belies genuine brawn. Like its bovine namesake, the Buffalo bike is built for the rigors of African use – heavy loads, rough terrain and infrequent maintenance (each one includes a small tool kit and a tire pump).

**Price:** $150 (est)



This one isn't like the others and meant for more "normal" times but the Dutch can really make bikes. They ride them a LOT.

Vanmoof S Series

**Country of origin:** Netherlands

**Details:** Amsterdam's Vanmoof has been colonising the gallery districts of major world capitals since 2009, winning aesthetes over with its bikes' Tinker Toy-like forms, tough materials and emphatically Dutch brand of sprezzatura. The S Series commuter bike builds on the no-frills original cycle without cluttering up the works. An eight-speed Shimano internal hub helps a rider handle hills, while disc brakes provide the stopping power of far more sophisticated – and far pricier – road bikes.

**Price:** $1,048 (S3 model, 28in wheel)
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Old 07-21-2016, 08:23 AM   #2
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I'll still take my black PK Ripper (still have it in the garage)...

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Old 07-21-2016, 08:28 AM   #3
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This was my first one (the one in the air), a older white model with the loop tail.

Cracked the seat tube on a jump.
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Old 07-21-2016, 09:44 AM   #4
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http://donkybike.com/


Now this one I could get excited about. That adjustable rack system in particular.

The only thing I don't see is a good trailer hitch. That could probably be crafted without much difficulty.

Alas, now that I'm in my fifties bike riding is beginning to tell on my knees.
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Old 07-21-2016, 01:46 PM   #5
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Laughing... started biking to/from my Thursday morning job today. It's not a tough or long ride; reasonably scenic & varied & not too long.

I am noticing increasing 'comfort' issues although they're still very minor & I suspect most happen because I'm not on the bike often enough.

The Donky bike caught my eye as well. A cheaper version would be a real boon in developing countries. It would provide a more stable way to carry larger loads of goods, looks like it doesn't take up much space & is 'screaming' for add-ons & adaptations for more specific uses.
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Old 07-21-2016, 07:33 PM   #6
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Probably the Donkey (in black) or Buffalo second for me of course it would get the foam filled tires.

http://www.tannus.com
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Old 07-21-2016, 08:03 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A.T. Hagan View Post
http://donkybike.com/


Now this one I could get excited about. That adjustable rack system in particular.

The only thing I don't see is a good trailer hitch. That could probably be crafted without much difficulty.

Alas, now that I'm in my fifties bike riding is beginning to tell on my knees.

I agree. The Donkey is definitely a better mousetrap, as we say in our house.

Even if my knees would let me bike, there isn't anywhere near us that is safe for biking. Not only are there no sidewalks, in most places the road doesn't even have a shoulder.

But I do like that bike.
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